Banff & Yoho National Park

I hadn’t really planned it, but after contemplating spending the weekend doing chores and cleaning the house I decided a weekend in the mountains was a far more appealing prospect. So I grabbed my gear packed a bag and headed west. My first stop was Bow Valley Provincial Park where I discovered an incredible view of Mount Yamnuska and sat basking in the sun on the shores of the Bow River for a long while, wishing that I had brought my fishing rod along and making a mental note to come back and try my luck on the river someday.

It had been late in the day when I left town and by the time I got to Banff I only had an hour or two of daylight left so I headed up to lake Minnewanka and then Mount Norquay for a look around before settling in to the hotel and a long soak in the hot tub.

Somewhere along the way I decided to give Yoho National Park a try. I think it was actually the hotel brochure that made me realize I had never been to Emerald Lake before, and although I have been to Takakkaw Falls I have never really photographed it.

Dawn’s light would have seen me racing west on the Trans-Canada, had there been any light coming through the heavy layers of overcast clouds that smothered the sunrise. I drove up the winding mountain road to the lake and wandered the shoreline for a little while. It really is a beautiful lake, but I found the effect slightly lessened by the hotel, and it’s residents out jogging around the lakeshore (despite the obscene hour) in bright neon clothes which really frustrated my picture taking. Still it would be worth another stop under better lighting conditions, although I would imagine it gets really crowded in the summer.

Apart from the people staying at the hotel I was the only person out on the road that early and spent a lot of time at the Natural Bridge area on the way back down, as well as chasing a couple of grouse up a tree and stopping in the middle of the road for a couple of wandering Elk.

Eventually I made it to Takakkaw Falls which made me very happy as I’ve been turned backed on a number of other occasions where they close the road for the winter, and I had no idea whether it would be open or not (turns out the road was scheduled to be closed the next day, so I just made it).

I spent a good hour or so crawling around on the rocks at the base of the falls. I had wanted to hike up a little ways, but the spray from the falls had coated all the rocks in a solid sheet of ice. So I had to settle with staying further down on the stream out of range of the spray. Which was probably good because it was plenty cold enough without having to face the falling water.

The weather was getting increasingly worse so I decided to head back a bit early, but couldn’t resist taking the long way up Spray Valley and back down Highway 40 in hopes of finding some wildlife, but apparently all the animals had already gone into hiding, and the drive was pretty uneventful.

Scenic Mount John Laurie Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Scenic Mount John Laurie Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Scenic Mount John Laurie Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Scenic Mount John Laurie Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Banff Townsite in the Rocky Mountains Alberta Canada
Banff Townsite in the Rocky Mountains Alberta Canada
Canoe Dock, Emerald Lake in Autumn, Yoho National Park, BC
Canoe Dock, Emerald Lake in Autumn, Yoho National Park, BC
Canoe Dock, Emerald Lake in Autumn, Yoho National Park, BC
Canoe Dock, Emerald Lake in Autumn, Yoho National Park, BC
Scenic Kicking Horse River, Yoho National Park, BC
Scenic Kicking Horse River, Yoho National Park, BC
Wild juvenile Elk, Yoho National Park, British Columbia, Canada
Wild juvenile Elk, Yoho National Park, British Columbia, Canada
Spruce Grouse in Autumn, Yoho National Park
Spruce Grouse in Autumn, Yoho National Park
Takakkaw Falls area Yoho National Park British Columbia Canada
Takakkaw Falls area Yoho National Park British Columbia Canada
Takakkaw Falls area Yoho National Park British Columbia Canada
Takakkaw Falls area Yoho National Park British Columbia Canada
Takakkaw Falls area Yoho National Park British Columbia Canada
Takakkaw Falls area Yoho National Park British Columbia Canada
Scenic Mountain Views Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Scenic Mountain Views Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Scenic Mountain Views Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Scenic Mountain Views Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada

Jura Canyon

Jura Canyon

  • Distance – Return – 6 km
  • Elevation Gain – 144 metres

I wasn’t overly sure I was feeling up to a hike when I parked my car in front of the cement plant on the side of Highway 1A. The wind was blowing so strong it slammed my car door closed on me as I was trying to get my pack ready, which is never a good sign. But I had been promised it was an easy hike, and that there would be Poutine at the end of it so off I went.

The hike was fairly straight forward following up a dry streambed to the top where it comes out through a narrow rock-walled canyon. Which is apparently a lot of fun in the summer when you can wade in the pools and climb all over the canyon. But in October it was mostly dry and what water there was was icy cold and half frozen. Still we had fun climbing around the canyon walls trying to avoid getting wet.

One of the more interesting parts of the hike was to see not only all of the damage caused by the recent floods, but also to see what they had done to deal with future flooding. The streambed we followed up to the canyon, despite now being completely dry, had apparently flooded quite severely and they had come in with graters and earthmovers and cut a massive channel down the mountainside that could probably hold the entire flow of the Bow River.

The weather had improved quite a lot by the time we got back the cars, so after the obligatory stop in Canmore for poutine I decided to make a quick, although not very productive trip up Highway 40.

Hiking views Jura Canyon, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Hiking views Jura Canyon, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Hiking views Jura Canyon, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Hiking views Jura Canyon, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Scenic Mountain Views Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Scenic Mountain Views Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Moose in a mountain meadow
Wild Moose in a mountain meadow

 

[map style=”width: auto; height:400px; margin:20px 0px 20px 0px; border: 1px solid black;” gpx=”https://photoboom.ca/wp/wp-content/uploads/09-28-13 – Jura Canyon.gpx”]

Weekend at Mount Robson River Lodge

Overlander Falls – Mount Robson Provincial Park

  • Distance – 6 km
  • Height Gain – 70 m

After our hike at Wilcox Pass we continued on our way up to the town of Jasper and then turned west on to the Yellowhead highway making the obligatory stop at the Mount Robson Visitor Centre for some photos and were lucky enough to find the mountain in plain view and not shrouded in clouds (as is the usual case). Continuing on west for a few kilometres we made it to the Mount Robson lodge where we had a cabin booked for the weekend.

The “lodge” consists of a bunch of little cabins off the side of the highway with a campground further down along the rivers edge. I would highly recomend the place, the cabins are small and a bit on the old run down side, and a little bit too close to the highway for my liking. But the area is really beautiful, and with just a short walk you’re down at the rivers edge right in the shadow of Mount Robson.

I don’t really remember the chronological order ot the weekend, but it was a great and relaxing weekend with family and friends.

We took long evening walk down around the campground and river at the lodge. Spent a fair bit of time on the back deck just enjoying the great views of Mount Robson. We had a crock pot going all day, and feasted on pulled pork sandwiches and coleslaw. We spent a night relaxing around the firepit, eating s’mores. We drove down to Valemont for groceries and a walk around the visitor centre and fish spawning park.

We visited the viewing platform of Reargard Falls, a picturesque waterfall that is named for the fact that it’s the farthest point in the river that spawning salmon make on their journey upstream from the ocean (I’ll have to go back someday during spawning season).

We stopped at Overland Falls, which is only a couple of minutes from the road, but then decided to take a walk down a small trail that follows along the top of the river canyon through the dense temperate cedar forest. It was meant as just a bit of a walk, but it was a beautiful day for hiking, cool and damp with the occasional sprinkle of rain which the forest provided more than enough shelter for. So we just kept hiking, enjoying the day until the trail finally ended on a side road that we had driven down earlier in the day and turned back to retrace our steps. Turns out by the time we got back we had done about six kilometres, so I guess it can be called a hike.

We headed down to the river for some late afternoon fishing and a beautiful sunset. Where I caught a nice sized trout on one of those perfect casts where you just know a fish is going to take the fly as soon as it hits the water. We laughed at Tiffany who had to go wading into the river to retrieve the handle of my spin fishing reel that she sent sailing into the water.

Majestic Mount Robson, Mount Robson Provincial Park British Columbia Canada
Majestic Mount Robson, Mount Robson Provincial Park British Columbia Canada
Majestic Mount Robson, Mount Robson Provincial Park British Columbia Canada
Majestic Mount Robson, Mount Robson Provincial Park British Columbia Canada
Waterfall and river views of the scenic Frasier River, Mount Robson Provicial Park, British Columbia Canada
Waterfall and river views of the scenic Fraser River, Mount Robson Provincial Park, British Columbia Canada
Rearguard falls on the scenic Fraser River, Mount Robson Provincial Park, British Columbia Canada
Rearguard Falls on the scenic Fraser River, Mount Robson Provincial Park, British Columbia Canada
Overlander Falls on the scenic Fraser River, Mount Robson Provincial Park, British Columbia Canada
Overlander Falls on the scenic Fraser River, Mount Robson Provincial Park, British Columbia Canada
Waterfall and river views of the scenic Frasier River, Mount Robson Provicial Park, British Columbia Canada
Waterfall and river views of the scenic Fraser River, Mount Robson Provincial Park, British Columbia Canada

 

[map style=”width: auto; height:400px; margin:20px 0px 20px 0px; border: 1px solid black;” gpx=”https://photoboom.ca/wp/wp-content/uploads/09-22-13 – Rearguard Falls (I think).gpx”]

Wilcox Pass – Jasper National Park

Wilcox Pass – Jasper National Park

  • Distance – Return (Where we decided to turn around) – 8 km
  • Elevation Gain – 389 metres

The trailhead to Wilcox Pass is located on the side of the parkway only a few kilometres south of the Columbia Icefields visitor centre. Being a fairly easy hike its a big draw for all the tourist that visit the centre, making it one of the busiest hikes in Jasper National Park. Even on a cold day in September there was a lot of people on the trail, that and the fact that you can hear the cars on the highway below for most of the hike definitely brings down the enjoyment level, but the views of the mountains and the Icefields and the meadow make it well worth the effort.

The hike starts out climbing through a beautiful old-growth forest. Although only a moderately climb it was definitely made worse by the weight of my 500mm lens, and the fact that I had been driving for the previous four or five hours. Once out of the forest the trail opens up above the tree line with an incredible view of the Athabasca Glacier, the visitor centre, the highway, and all of the towering mountains that surround the area. Eventually the trail leads up into a massive wide open alpine plain that goes on for what looks like a couple of kilometres.

I’m not really sure where the actual trail goes or how far of a hike it’s supposed to be, there seems to be a few different descriptions online, although I did read somewhere that you can hike all the way to Tangle falls (another stopping point on the 93) but then you would need a ride back to the trailhead. On this occasion we basically just hiked up to the alpine plain and kept going until we decided to turn back.

One of the main draws to the pass is the Rocky Mountain Big Horned Sheep that frequent the area (hence me lugging my long, heavy lens up the mountain). We were not disappointed, and found a group of large healthy adult Big Horned Sheep feeding and drinking at a watering hole out in the open meadow. We stopped and photographed them for a quite a while (the whole time wishing I had dragged my tripod up along with the long lens) before heading back down the way we came.

Did I mention it was cold and extremely windy out in the open….

Overall a great hike, and well worth the effort, I look forward to going back when I have more time to spend exploring the area.

Rocky Mountain Bighorn Sheep, Wilcox Pass, Jasper National Park, Alberta Canada
Rocky Mountain Bighorn Sheep, Wilcox Pass, Jasper National Park, Alberta Canada
Rocky Mountain Bighorn Sheep, Wilcox Pass, Jasper National Park, Alberta Canada
Rocky Mountain Bighorn Sheep, Wilcox Pass, Jasper National Park, Alberta Canada
Rocky Mountain Bighorn Sheep, Wilcox Pass, Jasper National Park, Alberta Canada
Rocky Mountain Bighorn Sheep, Wilcox Pass, Jasper National Park, Alberta Canada
Rocky Mountain Bighorn Sheep, Wilcox Pass, Jasper National Park, Alberta Canada
Rocky Mountain Bighorn Sheep, Wilcox Pass, Jasper National Park, Alberta Canada
Scenic Mountain Views, Wilcox Pass, Jasper National Park, Alberta Canada
Scenic Mountain Views, Wilcox Pass, Jasper National Park, Alberta Canada
Scenic Mountain Views, Wilcox Pass, Jasper National Park, Alberta Canada
Scenic Mountain Views, Wilcox Pass, Jasper National Park, Alberta Canada
Scenic Mountain Views, Wilcox Pass, Jasper National Park, Alberta Canada
Scenic Mountain Views, Wilcox Pass, Jasper National Park, Alberta Canada
Wilcox Pass, and views of the Columbia Icefields, Jasper National Park, Alberta Canada
Wilcox Pass, and views of the Columbia Icefields, Jasper National Park, Alberta Canada
Rocky Mountain Bighorn Sheep, Wilcox Pass, Jasper National Park, Alberta Canada
Rocky Mountain Bighorn Sheep, Wilcox Pass, Jasper National Park, Alberta Canada

 

[map style=”width: auto; height:400px; margin:20px 0px 20px 0px; border: 1px solid black;” gpx=”https://photoboom.ca/wp/wp-content/uploads/09-20-13 – Wilcox Pass.gpx”]

 

Autumn at Elbow Lake

Another beautiful day at Elbow Lake…

A bit of a hike, a couple of fish. What more can I ask for…

I’ll spare you the details as I’ve covered Elbow Lake a few times already…

Scenic Mountain Views, Elbow Lake area, Peter Lougheed Provincial Park, Alberta Canada
Scenic Mountain Views, Elbow Lake area, Peter Lougheed Provincial Park, Alberta Canada
Scenic Mountain Views, Elbow Lake area, Peter Lougheed Provincial Park, Alberta Canada
Scenic Mountain Views, Elbow Lake area, Peter Lougheed Provincial Park, Alberta Canada
Scenic Mountain Views, Elbow Lake area, Peter Lougheed Provincial Park, Alberta Canada
Scenic Mountain Views, Elbow Lake area, Peter Lougheed Provincial Park, Alberta Canada
Scenic Mountain Views, Elbow Lake area, Peter Lougheed Provincial Park, Alberta Canada
Scenic Mountain Views, Elbow Lake area, Peter Lougheed Provincial Park, Alberta Canada

 

[map style=”width: auto; height:400px; margin:20px 0px 20px 0px; border: 1px solid black;” z=”1″ gpx=”https://photoboom.ca/wp/wp-content/uploads/Elbow Lake 91113.gpx”]

 

.

Bolton Creek – Camping

We were a bit slow getting out of town and it was mid afternoon by the time we got to the Bolton Creek Campground. The weather was pretty crappy and it was drizzling a little bit so the first thing we did was string a tarp up over the picnic table… Then it rained… and rained… and rained… and we sat for a couple of hours on top of the table under a tarp that leaked like a seive and was too small to cover the benches of the the table, and watched it rain.

Eventually it lessend a little bit and we were able to get the tent and the rest of camp set up before running down to the camp store to buy a new non-leaking much larger tarp.

On the way out of town we had stopped at the grocery store with no particular meal plan, and after a bit of discussion decided that beef stew should be fairly easy in the camp pot, so we bought;

  • one onion
  • two carrots
  • two potatoes
  • one bulb of garlic
  • one pack of stewing beef
  • one bag of mushrooms
  • one carton of Beef Stock

Back at camp we threw it all in the pot over the fire and let it cook nice and slow, realizing a good stew needs to be a bit thicker than just beef stock I toasted up a hot dog bun and crumbled it into the pot. Maybe I was just cold and wet and hungry, but by the time we sat down to eat at about eleven o’clock at night (do to the fact that it took all afternoon to get the fire going in the rain), it was quite possibly the best bowl of stew I’ve ever eaten.

The rest of the trip was entirely uneventful. That being said there is something strangely enjoyable and relaxing to spending an evening with friends while sitting under a tarp in the pouring rain.

Mountain views, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Mountain views, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Mountain views, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Mountain views, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada

Pika at Rawson Lake

Rawson Lake 

  • 8 Kilometres Return
  • 280 Metre Elevation Gain

After my first trip to Rawson Lake back in 2011 (read my previous my more detailed post about the hike here.. https://photoboom.ca/wp/?p=3129), I’ve been wanting to go back for a number of reasons. The first of which was for the pikas. There is a huge talus field running along the south side the lake, and on my previous trip I could hear the high pitched whistles of the small rodents all over the mountain side. Although I know of a couple other places were pikas can be found (there’s a small colony on the way to Elbow Lake), but the one at Rawson Lake is far larger and more populated than most. The pikas are a small animal, and although I’ve been able to get close to some in the past, they are quite small and I was never able to get close enough with my 200 mm lens to satisfy me. So, armed with my 500 mm lens I was looking forward to getting some nice close up shots.

After lugging my heavy lens up to the lake we were not disappointed, they were literally all over place, running back and forth collecting foliage for their winter stores.

The second reason I wanted to go back there was to do some more fishing at such a beautiful mountain lake. That being said I ended up having so much fun photographing the pikas that I never really ended up doing much fishing.

I made two major mistakes on this trip up to the lake. The first was not bringing my tripod, it’s heavy and awkward, and I didn’t want to pack it the 280 metres of elevation up the mountainside to the lake. It would definitely have been worth the effort to bring it as they are fast moving little animals, and with the lake sinking into the shade of the mountain so early the extra stability in low light would have been helpful. The second mistake was to go so late in the day, Mount Sarrail towers so high and close to the west side of the lake that the sun slips behind it so early we didn’t have much time to enjoy the beautiful autumn day.

By the time we got back to the shores of Upper Kananaskis Lake, the sun was finally setting for real, and we were able to catch one of the most impressive mountain sunsets I’ve ever seen. Once again, I was left wishing I had brought my tripod.

Wild Pika feeding on grass in a talus field, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Pika feeding on grass in a talus field, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Pika feeding on grass in a talus field, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Pika feeding on grass in a talus field, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Pika feeding on grass in a talus field, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Pika feeding on grass in a talus field, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Pika feeding on grass in a talus field, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Pika feeding on grass in a talus field, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Mountain views, Rawson Lake, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Mountain views, Rawson Lake, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Mountain sunset over Kananaskis Lake, Alberta Canada
Mountain sunset over Kananaskis Lake, Alberta Canada
Mountain sunset over Kananaskis Lake, Alberta Canada
Mountain sunset over Kananaskis Lake, Alberta Canada
Mountain sunset over Kananaskis Lake, Alberta Canada
Mountain sunset over Kananaskis Lake, Alberta Canada

 

[map style=”width: auto; height:400px; margin:20px 0px 20px 0px; border: 1px solid black;” gpx=”https://photoboom.ca/wp/wp-content/uploads/090213 – Rawson Lake.gpx”]

Hawk

This Swainson’s Hawk has been taunting me all summer, I think it nests in a tree beside a road that I drive down for work on a weekly basis. I’ve seen it catching gophers, and flying down the road with me at eye level, and eating roadkill in the ditch, and so on and so on, all within a couple of metres of the road and this tree…

So I finally remembered to bring my camera, and the day turned cold and windy and it just sat right there in the tree and stared at me refusing to put on a show. But I got my picture either way.

Juvenile Swainson's Hawk perched in a pine tree, Alberta Canada
Juvenile Swainson’s Hawk perched in a pine tree, Alberta Canada

Kananaskis Country

Another great drive down Highway 40 and Spray Lakes Trail in Kananaskis Country, with a rather cute Bighorn Sheep near Galatea trailhead, a Moose in the meadows by Mount Shark, and a somewhat ugly Cinnamon Black Bear feeding on berries near the shores of Spray Lake….

 

Young Rocky Mountain Bighorn Sheep Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Young Rocky Mountain Bighorn Sheep Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Young Rocky Mountain Bighorn Sheep Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Young Rocky Mountain Bighorn Sheep Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild moose feeding among bushes, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild moose feeding among bushes, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Cinnamon coloured Black Bear feeding on berries, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Cinnamon coloured Black Bear feeding on berries, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Cinnamon coloured Black Bear feeding on berries, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Cinnamon coloured Black Bear feeding on berries, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada

Cranbrook, B.C.

We decided to take a weekend trip down to Cranbrook in British Columbia and although I’m not really sure why we decided to go there it seemed like a good idea at the time. I think the original destination was Kimberly, but when we got into town it was basically empty, so we decided to continue on to Cranbrook. The weekend turned out to be pretty uneventful and we didn’t end up doing a whole lot other than getting lost on some crappy forestry roads, and a really short hike that was supposed to go to a waterfall, but since the trail was washed out and neither of us wanted to get our feet wet, we never got within sight of the actual falls.

We also took a walk around a wetland on the edge of town, and photographed some Grebes and other waterfowl. Overall not very exciting, at least until we got back to Alberta, where we found a couple of young Osprey in a nest on top of a bridge at Castle Mountain in Banff. Although still juvenile they were nearly adult size, and we watched for a long time  while up on the nest, one of them tested out it’s wings, flapping away on the verge of becoming airborne, but never quite achieving liftoff. Further down the parkway we ran into a pair (mother and yearling or two year old cub I think) of Black Bears feeding on berries in front of a mob of people.

[portfolio_slideshow id=5023]

 

Wild Black Bear feeding on berries, Banff National Park Alberta Canada
Wild Black Bear feeding on berries, Banff National Park Alberta Canada
Wild Black Bear feeding on berries, Banff National Park Alberta Canada
Wild Black Bear feeding on berries, Banff National Park Alberta Canada
Wild Black Bear feeding on berries, Banff National Park Alberta Canada
Wild Black Bear feeding on berries, Banff National Park Alberta Canada
Wild Black Bear feeding on berries, Banff National Park Alberta Canada
Wild Black Bear feeding on berries, Banff National Park Alberta Canada
Juvenile Osprey on a nest learning to fly, Banff National Park Alberta Canada
Juvenile Osprey on a nest learning to fly, Banff National Park Alberta Canada
Juvenile Osprey on a nest learning to fly, Banff National Park Alberta Canada
Juvenile Osprey on a nest learning to fly, Banff National Park Alberta Canada
Scenic Castle Mountain, Banff National Park, Alberta, Canada
Scenic Castle Mountain, Banff National Park, Alberta, Canada
Scenic Mountain views of the Kootenay River, Kootenay National Park, BC Canada
Scenic Mountain views of the Kootenay River, Kootenay National Park, BC Canada
Scenic Mountain views of the Kootenay River, Kootenay National Park, BC Canada
Scenic Mountain views of the Kootenay River, Kootenay National Park, BC Canada
Eared Grebe feeding young on a prairie lake, Alberta Canada
Eared Grebe feeding young on a prairie lake, Alberta Canada
White-tailed deer alert to danger on the forests edge
White-tailed deer alert to danger on the forests edge
Eastern Kingbird perched on a reed over a prairie lake
Eastern Kingbird perched on a reed over a prairie lake

Bolton Creek Kananaskis – Camping

I headed out early to Kananaskis country to take pictures, and had after a run-in with a Ruffed grouse and a couple of deer, on the Jumpingpound road (Hwy 68?) I headed up along the #40 to the lakes and shooting pictures along the way. Eventually the weather turned and it clouded up and started to drizzle. So I thought I would stop by Bolton Creek Campground where my sister was camping with a couple of friends. I ended up staying the night (there are benefits to keeping all of your camp gear in the trunk of your car).

I woke the next morning to the sound of rain, which cleared up shortly after, so we decided we’d go for a quick hike, and headed out for the Mt. Everest Expedition Trail, which is basically just a 2 kilometer walk to a lookout point over Kananaskis Lakes.

I also spent a bit of time wandering and photographing the shoreline of the lakes and assessing the damage caused by the recent floods . Then after packing up camp I decided I might was well take the long route back down spray lakes trail, where I spotted a Great Blue Heron out on the lake standing on a old rotten tree stump a few metres from shore.

 

White-tailed deer in tall summer grass, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
White-tailed deer in tall summer grass, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Ruffed Grouse on a roadside in the foothills, Alberta Canada
Ruffed Grouse on a roadside in the foothills, Alberta Canada
Scenic mountain pond, Kananaskis Country Alberta, Canada
Scenic mountain pond, Kananaskis Country Alberta, Canada
Scenic mountain lake, Kananaskis Country Alberta, Canada
Scenic mountain lake, Kananaskis Country Alberta, Canada
Scenic mountain lake, Kananaskis Country Alberta, Canada
Scenic mountain lake, Kananaskis Country Alberta, Canada
Scenic mountain lake, Kananaskis Country Alberta, Canada
Scenic mountain lake, Kananaskis Country Alberta, Canada
Scenic mountain views, Kananaskis Country Alberta, Canada
Scenic mountain views, Kananaskis Country Alberta, Canada
Scenic mountain lake, Kananaskis Country Alberta, Canada
Scenic mountain lake, Kananaskis Country Alberta, Canada
Scenic mountain lake, Kananaskis Country Alberta, Canada
Scenic mountain lake, Kananaskis Country Alberta, Canada
Scenic mountain views, Kananaskis Country Alberta, Canada
Scenic mountain views, Kananaskis Country Alberta, Canada
Scenic mountain views, Kananaskis Country Alberta, Canada
Scenic mountain views, Kananaskis Country Alberta, Canada
Scenic mountain lake, Kananaskis Country Alberta, Canada
Scenic mountain lake, Kananaskis Country Alberta, Canada
Scenic mountain lake, Kananaskis Country Alberta, Canada
Scenic mountain lake, Kananaskis Country Alberta, Canada
Great Blue Heron wading in a mountain pond, Alberta Canada
Great Blue Heron on a old tree stump, Spray Lakes, Alberta Canada

 

 

[portfolio_slideshow id=5019]

Kananaskis – Flood 2013

In the last week or so of June 2013 Calgary had its worst flood in well…. ever… with both rivers spilling over their banks and flowing through much of downtown. But you probably know all this so that’s about all I’m gonna say about it (here’s some more info if you don’t know all about it… http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2013_Alberta_floods).

Anyway things were pretty crazy in town, but in all reality it didn’t affect me in the least little bit, in fact I never even saw any of the flood water or river until about a week after it had crested. But as soon as the roads began reopen in Kananaskis country I knew I had to head out to have a look at the damage.

The damage was pretty crazy to see… tiny little streams had cut 20 foot chasms into hillsides and stripped shorelines of trees and plants and soil in huge swaths and ripping roads and bridges right off their foundations. What was really amazing was to see just how much earth the water had moved, roadside ditches that had been 10 feet deep were now filled to road level with dirty or gravel, and whole hillside that used to overlook the iver were simply not there anymore. At one point on the Spray Lakes trail I got out to take a walk along the stream that runs parallel to the road. The first thing I noticed was how wide the stream-bed was, it had probably only been about 10 feet across before the flood, but was now more like 40 or 50 feet across, with the bank on the other side made up of a wall of freshly exposed soil. But what really got me was the smell. The smell of pine coming from the hundreds or thousands of twisted, broken, and downed pine trees that lined the sides of the shore was so strong it literally made my eyes water and burned my sinuses, it was really quite remarkable.

Looking back (yes it’s almost a year later that I’m writing this), whats really crazy to think about is just how long the scars of that flood will be present, the debris and sticks and branches and mud stuck ten feet high in the trees will likely take a good 5 years to be dislodge and washed completely away. The piles of broken and downed trees might be recognizable for a decade or two or three. The changed in the course of the rivers and streams, and the deposits of gravel and dirt and boulders might take a few decades to become healed to the point where they no longer look like a visible scar on the landscape, but in all reality they might be there for a few centuries or longer, or basically forever, at least until the next big flood. Or until we decide to pave over them and put in a new parking lot.

Flood Damage on a mountain stream Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada, 2013
Flood Damage on a mountain stream Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada, 2013

Frank Lake

Another evening out at Frank Lake…

I had my first experience with the Common Tern, and they may be one of my new favourite birds, I think I could spend hours watching them hover over the water searching for fish and diving down with a splash to catch them in their beaks.

While the Tern’s didn’t stay around very long there were ample other birds to watch and photograph, including the horrendously ugly baby Coots, and the tiny little Eared Grebe chicks riding around on their mothers backs. For the fist time that I’ve been to Frank Lake the light was better than just mediocre, and by the time the golden hour hit, it was just about the perfect way to spend a summers evening on the prairies.
[portfolio_slideshow id=5015]

Common Tern hovering in flight over a prairie lake
Common Tern hovering in flight over a prairie lake
Gravel backroad through Alberta Farmland at sunset
Gravel backroad through Alberta Farmland at sunset
Black-necked Stilt wading on the shores of a prairie lake, Alberta Canada
Black-necked Stilt wading on the shores of a prairie lake, Alberta Canada
American Avocet Alberta Canada
American Avocet Alberta Canada
Common Tern hovering in flight over a prairie lake
Common Tern hovering in flight over a prairie lake
Black-necked Stilt wading on the shores of a prairie lake, Alberta Canada
Black-necked Stilt wading on the shores of a prairie lake, Alberta Canada
American White Pelican on a prairie pond Alberta Canada
American White Pelican on a prairie pond Alberta Canada
Common Tern hovering in flight over a prairie lake
Common Tern hovering in flight over a prairie lake
Alberta farmland under stormy skies at sunset
Alberta farmland under stormy skies at sunset
Brewer's Blackbird on a Barbed wire fence post, Alberta Canada
Brewer’s Blackbird on a Barbed wire fence post, Alberta Canada
Juvenile Brown-headed Cowbird on a country road, Alberta Canada
Juvenile Brown-headed Cowbird on a country road, Alberta Canada
Marbled Godwit feeding on the shores of a prairie wetland, Alberta Canada
Marbled Godwit feeding on the shores of a prairie wetland, Alberta Canada
Wilson's Phalarope feeding on a prairie lake, Alberta Canada
Wilson’s Phalarope feeding on a prairie lake, Alberta Canada
American Coot feeding young chicks on a prairie lake, Alberta Canada
American Coot feeding young chicks on a prairie lake, Alberta Canada
Ruddy Duck swimming in a prairie pond, Alberta, Canada
Ruddy Duck swimming in a prairie pond, Alberta, Canada
American Coot (Fulica americana)
American Coot (Fulica americana)
Barn Swallow Perched on a sign, Alberta Canada
Barn Swallow Perched on a sign, Alberta Canada
Eared Grebe with young on a prairie lake, Alberta Canada
Eared Grebe with young on a prairie lake, Alberta Canada
Western Grebe swimming in a prairie lake, Alberta Canada
Western Grebe swimming in a prairie lake, Alberta Canada

Glacier National Park, Montana

(Pictures are in reverse orders… and it’s far to much of a hassle to rearrange them)

I took a trip down across the border to Glacier National Park in Montana to go camping for the weekend. My original plan was to stay at Many Glaciers, but after a three hour wait at the border, by the time I got there the only site still available backed onto the parking lot for a hotel or grocery store or something like that, so I decided to continued on to glacier. After driving over Logan’s Pass I ended up at Avalanche Campground which turned out to be a really neat area. The campground is in a area of rainforest right next to a grove of large cedars with a boardwalk hiking trail where I spent my first evening wandering around the river and forest (see map below).

I got up stupidly early the next morning and drove back up to the top of the pass in hopes of shooting some pictures. As beautiful as Going to the Sun road is it’s not very photogenic from the road, especially in the early morning when sun hasn’t made it up above the mountains and half the range is still in shadow. I almost hit a Mountain Goat with my car coming around one of the really tight corners near the top of the pass, and was able to snap a picture of it on the way day but with its winter fur still being shed it wasn’t a very pretty one.

After failing to get any good pictures up on the pass I thought I would try going the other direction. I ended up doing a lot of driving allover the place following the river out of the park and doing my best to get lost on some terrible gravel roads. I had been told by someone that there was a lot of wildlife in the park, which was my main reason for going down there, but other than the goat on the pass and a Snowshoe Hare in a parking lot I didn’t see a single thing.

Eventually I made it back to camp and feeling a bit defeated decided I had enough driving for the day. The campground I was staying at was also the trailhead for a hike to Avalanche Lake so I thought I would give it a try.

The hike up to the lake was a really nice change from all of the time I had spent in the car over the last couple of days.

The hike is a basic forest trail climbing steadily over the 4 kilometres and gaining about 200 metres in elevation to the mountain lake. The lake was quite beautiful and I was really wishing I had my fishing rod with me as the fish were jumping and surface feeding all over the lake. I didn’t get to stay at the lake nearly as long as I would have liked, but it was evening when I started, and completely dark by the time I got back.

On the way back I decided to go through Waterton in hopes of seeing some wildlife. I was not disappointed. Within a kilometre or two  of crossing the border back into Canada I spotted a moose but didn’t have time to grab my camera, a couple kilometres after that a grizzly crossed the road in front of me, but was gone by the time I got there.

A bit further on I caught something moving out of the corner of my eye and pulled over to have a look. I spent a good ten minutes sitting in my car catching occasional glimpses of movement before I finally figured out what I was seeing. It was huge funny looking bird out in the tall grass, my first Sandhill Crane. Once I figured out it wasn’t a bear I climbed out of the car and went stalking through the grass and bushes to try and get a picture of it. It turned out there was actually two of them, and they move fast, seaming to disappear completely in one place and popping up in another a few moments later. I only manage to get one or two clear shots, but the sighting was enough to make me feel better about the previous lack of wildlife.

Once in the main part of Waterton I drove the Red Rock Canyon Parkway and spent ten minutes watching a cinnamon coloured black bear at a distance, then checked the flats looking for Elk but didn’t spot any. Leaving Waterton I opted for the slower route home through Glenwood so that I could make a quick stop at the windmill farms.

 

Windfarm in the scenic prairies, Alberta Canada
Wind farm in the scenic prairies, Alberta Canada
Windfarm in the scenic prairies, Alberta Canada
Wind farm in the scenic prairies, Alberta Canada
Windfarm in the scenic prairies, Alberta Canada
Wind farm in the scenic prairies, Alberta Canada
Windfarm in the scenic prairies, Alberta Canada
Wind farm in the scenic prairies, Alberta Canada
Farm country in the foothills of the rocky mountains, Alberta Canada
Farm country in the foothills of the rocky mountains, Alberta Canada
Farm country in the foothills of the rocky mountains, Alberta Canada
Farm country in the foothills of the rocky mountains, Alberta Canada
Wild black bear, Waterton National Park, AB.
Wild black bear, Waterton National Park, AB.
Wild Sandhill Crane, Waterton National Park, Alberta Canada
Wild Sandhill Crane, Waterton National Park, Alberta Canada
Chief Mountain
Chief Mountain
Scenic mountain views, Many Glaciers National Park Montana USA
Scenic mountain views, Many Glaciers National Park Montana USA
Scenic mountain views, Many Glaciers National Park Montana USA
Scenic mountain views, Many Glaciers National Park Montana USA
Scenic mountain views, Avalanche Lake, Glacier National Park Montana USA
Scenic mountain views, Avalanche Lake, Glacier National Park Montana USA
Scenic mountain views, Avalanche Lake, Glacier National Park Montana USA
Scenic mountain views, Avalanche Lake, Glacier National Park Montana USA
Scenic mountain views, Avalanche Lake, Glacier National Park Montana USA
Scenic mountain views, Avalanche Lake, Glacier National Park Montana USA
Scenic mountain views, Avalanche Lake, Glacier National Park Montana USA
Scenic mountain views, Avalanche Lake, Glacier National Park Montana USA

 

Hike to Avalanche Lake, Glacier National Park, Montana

  • Distance – Return (with some walking along the lakeshore) – 8.1 km
  • Elevation Gain – 227 metres

[map style=”width: auto; height:400px; margin:20px 0px 20px 0px; border: 1px solid black;” gpx=”https://photoboom.ca/wp/wp-content/uploads/062913 – Avalanche Lake, Glacier National Park Montana.gpx”]

Snowshoe Hare in summer colours feeding on grass
Snowshoe Hare in summer colours feeding on grass
Scenic mountain views, Glacier National Park Montana USA
Scenic mountain views, Glacier National Park Montana USA
Mountain goat, Glacier National Park Montana USA
Mountain goat, Glacier National Park Montana USA
Scenic mountain views, Glacier National Park Montana USA
Scenic mountain views, Glacier National Park Montana USA
Scenic mountain views, Glacier National Park Montana USA
Scenic mountain views, Glacier National Park Montana USA
Scenicriver views, Glacier National Park Montana USA
Scenic river views, Glacier National Park Montana USA
Scenic mountain views, Glacier National Park Montana USA
Scenic mountain views, Glacier National Park Montana USA

Rainforest Boardwalk, Glacier National Park, Montana

[map style=”width: auto; height:400px; margin:20px 0px 20px 0px; border: 1px solid black;” gpx=”https://photoboom.ca/wp/wp-content/uploads/Rainforest Boardwalk, Glacier N.P. Montana – 06_28_13.gpx”]

 

Random Driving Tour around Glacier National Park and Home to Calgary

[map style=”width: auto; height:400px; margin:20px 0px 20px 0px; border: 1px solid black;” gpx=”https://photoboom.ca/wp/wp-content/uploads/062913 – Driving – Glacier NP Montana.gpx”]

Camping – Jasper National Park Alberta

What a great weekend… Karl and I headed out to Jasper on Friday morning making quick time (especially for us) up Highway 93. We stopped briefly for a Mountain Goat on the side of a cliff overlooking the highway, but other than that it was a pretty uneventful drive with cloudy overcast skies not worth photographing.

We made it to the campground relatively early, we had reserved a spot at Whistlers Campground, and on the way in we passed a bunch of Elk with cute little spotted fawns, but were too lazy to change lenses and decided to come back after setting up camp. Big big mistake, we never saw them again.

Later on we had some great success on the Malign Lake Road spotting a bunch of Black Bears, although with overcast skies the light was lacking and faded quickly, but the road was quite and we were able to spend some time photographing them.

The next morning we drove west to Mount Robson and encountered a grizzly on the side of Highway 16, but couldn’t really get into a decent position, until it crossed over the road in front of us. I managed to grab a couple of shots as we passed by on the busy highway, but it was so deep in the ditch that the angle made it almost impossible.

Back at the campground we met up with the Derkowski’s for lunch while they set up camp. After a bit more evening exploring and a ridiculously close encounter on foot with a black bear, we had spotted it from across the lake then parked and walked down to were it was heading and it popped up right in front of us, closer than we had expected.

After that it was dinner time and we feasted on some of the best ever Campfire Chili, and relaxed around the fire enjoying the all you can burn firewood that the campground offers.

The way back was slow with traffic. A washroom break was made amusing by the Parkway’s resident Ravens, and we spotted a beautiful bull Elk with velvet antlers on the Bow Valley Parkway in Banff.

 

Wild Black Bear feeding on dandelions, Jasper National Park Alberta Canada
Wild Black Bear feeding on dandelions, Jasper National Park Alberta Canada
Wild Black Bear feeding on dandelions, Jasper National Park Alberta Canada
Wild Black Bear feeding on dandelions, Jasper National Park Alberta Canada
Close up of a Grizzly Bear feeding on Dandelions, Jasper National Park  Alberta Canada
Close up of a Grizzly Bear feeding on Dandelions, Jasper National Park Alberta Canada
Wild Black Bear walking down a road, Jasper National Park Alberta Canada
Wild Black Bear walking down a road, Jasper National Park Alberta Canada
Mountain goat  on a Cliff face, Jasper National Park Alberta Canada
Mountain goat on a Cliff face, Jasper National Park Alberta Canada
American Black Bear (Ursus americanus)
American Black Bear (Ursus americanus)
Adult Grizzly Bear crossing a highway, Jasper National Park  Alberta Canada
Adult Grizzly Bear crossing a highway, Jasper National Park Alberta Canada
Wild Black Bear walking down a road, Jasper National Park Alberta Canada
Wild Black Bear walking down a road, Jasper National Park Alberta Canada
Bald Eagle perched in a dead tree, Jasper National Park Alberta
Bald Eagle perched in a dead tree, Jasper National Park Alberta
Scenic mountain views, Maligne Lake Jasper National Park Alberta, Canada
Scenic mountain views, Maligne Lake Jasper National Park Alberta, Canada
Scenic mountain views, Maligne Lake Jasper National Park Alberta, Canada
Scenic mountain views, Maligne Lake Jasper National Park Alberta, Canada
Wild Black Bear walking down a road, Jasper National Park Alberta Canada
Wild Black Bear walking down a road, Jasper National Park Alberta Canada
Wild Black Bear walking down a road, Jasper National Park Alberta Canada
Wild Black Bear walking down a road, Jasper National Park Alberta Canada
Wild Black Bear feeding on dandelions, Jasper National Park Alberta Canada
Wild Black Bear feeding on dandelions, Jasper National Park Alberta Canada
Large cast iron pot of spicy chili cooking over a campfire
Large cast iron pot of spicy chili cooking over a campfire
Common Raven, Jasper National Park Alberta Canada
Common Raven, Jasper National Park Alberta Canada
Common Raven, Jasper National Park Alberta Canada
Common Raven, Jasper National Park Alberta Canada
Wild Bull Elk, Banff National Park Alberta Canada
Wild Bull Elk, Banff National Park Alberta Canada
Wild Bull Elk, Banff National Park Alberta Canada
Wild Bull Elk, Banff National Park Alberta Canada

Sibbald Meadows – Moose

Rule #1… Always have your camera ready…

I headed out to do some fishing at Sibbald meadows Pond, and shortly after turning off the highway I was thinking I should pull over and put my long lens on the camera when I spotted this big beautiful (if somewhat shaggy) moose standing knee deep in a marsh with a mouthful of grass staring straight at me… And my camera was still in the bag. It was easily the most iconic moose scene I’ve ever witnessed, and I totally missed it.  I stopped in the middle of the road and tried to gear up as quick as I could and got off a couple shots before it headed off away from the road. But it doesn’t really do justice to the original scene.

I don’t think I caught any fish on this particular evening, but a moose sighting, as well as some bluebirds I had been meaning to photograph (there’s a section of the road to the pond lined with nesting boxes), made for a nice evening out..

Wild North American Moose, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild North American Moose, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Male Mountain Bluebird on a barbed wire fence post
Male Mountain Bluebird on a barbed wire fence post
Osprey in a pine tree, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Osprey in a pine tree, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Tree Swallow perched on a fence post
Tree Swallow perched on a fence post

Osprey Nest

There is an Osprey nesting platform just off to the side of Highway #22… or The Marquis De Lorne Trail… or Stoney Trail…. I think it’s now being called…

Anyway… it’s right near the overpass were the highway crosses over Macleod Trail on the south end of Calgary. I’ve been driving past the platform for the past few seasons, but never got around to stopping mostly because I wasn’t sure where to access it from. Turns out there is actually a small gravel road that runs right under the nest. After realizing this, and seeing the Osprey return to the nest this spring I decided I would have to find the time to visit it.

The really great thing about this nest is that it is right beside the overpass and you can climb up the embankment and end up only a couple metres below the level of the nest (instead of looking up at it from ground level). The nest is also located right beside a large pond or slough, so it is very active, and you can sit up on the hillside and watch them catch fish in the pond and then return to the nest to eat them.

The pictures below are just a few of the hundreds I shot on two different visits I made to the nest over the course of the summer. You can’t really tell, but on at least one occasion there was two or three young chicks in the nest, though they never really came far enough out of the nest to get a picture of.

 

Osprey on a perch under a rising moon, Alberta Canada
Osprey on a perch under a rising moon, Alberta Canada
Osprey landing on a nest over a prairie lake, Alberta Canada
Osprey landing on a nest over a prairie lake, Alberta Canada
Osprey in flight with a fish, Alberta Canada
Osprey in flight with a fish, Alberta Canada
Osprey on a nest above a prairie lake, Alberta Canada
Osprey on a nest above a prairie lake, Alberta Canada
Osprey on a nest above a prairie lake, Alberta Canada
Osprey on a nest above a prairie lake, Alberta Canada
Osprey on a perch, Alberta Canada
Osprey on a perch, Alberta Canada

Grasslands National Park Saskatchewan

I first read something about the endangered Sage Grouse in Grasslands NP a few years ago… and then I read about the Black Footed Ferrets which had become extinct in the wild, until recently when they were successfully reintroduced into Grasslands NP from captive populations. Then I read about the Golden Eagles that nest in areas of the park, and the Burrowing owls and Prairie Dogs (not to be confused with common ground squirrels) that make their home there. While all of these caught my interest, the truth is I had never been to Saskatchewan and I live too close to have never visited our neighboring province. At about 650 kilometres from Calgary it is a long drive to the park, and I couldn’t really justify the distance until I got a super-telephoto lens, as most of the wildlife in the park are birds or small mammals, and I figured it would pretty much be a waste of time with anything shorter than a 300 or 400mm lens.

Not only is it a long drive, but it’s an extremely uneventful one.  I only stopped once on the drive there, and that was 600 km in and I only stopped to get gas and dinner (knowing it was the last place to fill up the tank before the park). Toward the end of the drive I turned east onto a rather rundown and potholed but still somewhat paved farm road with ponds and sloughs along the ditches that where filled with ducks and waterfowl of all different kinds. I’ve never before seen such abundance, everywhere I looked there were birds in the ponds, and the skies, and the fields, on every tree branch and fence post, it was pretty unbelievable.

The motto of Saskatchewan is  “The land of living skies” I always thought that was in reference to the clouds and big blue wide open skies. But I was wrong, it’s the birds, and although my experience of the province in very limited, I can say its a very suitable motto.

The village at the edge of the park is tiny (there isn’t even a gas station), with little more than a visitor centre (which was closed) and a ‘hotel’ that was nothing more than a house with rooms to rent, and after a quick glance decided tenting in the park was a better option.

The park itself consists of little more than a gravel road running though the open grasslands with a treeless campground on a hilltop in the middle. There were free roaming bison wandering throughout, and the birds were so active that I was stopping every 10 metres to take pictures. I saw my first burrowing owls, the large prairie dog towns, a lone pronghorn, and young bison butting heads and chasing each other around, as well as more small bird than I could count or identify. kingbirds, and mourning doves, and meadowlarks, sparrows of all different design. I almost hit a harrier hawk with my car but it flew off before I could get a decent photo.

Eventually I made it to the campground just as darkness was setting in, and found it completely empty, to say it was a bit eerie is an understatement, but thankfully there was a box of firewood so at least I was able to have a fire.

I was really hoping to try taking some pictures of the night sky and saw the faint glow of northern lights dancing around overhead, but the stars never came out, thick fog and a light dusting of dry snow began to blanketed the campground so I headed off to bed.

I was woken in the middle of the night by the ear piercing yips and howls of coyotes coming from every direction there must have been at least a dozen of them and I was completely surrounded. They were so close that the volumn of there voices hurt my ears and I could hear their footsteps in the tall grass as they circled around my tent. Coyotes don’t frighten me much but it did occur to me that a large pack could become a serious problem. Then I had an idea, and hit the panic button on my car remote, and literally laughed to myself as I heard them scatter, their yips and noises moving quickly away over the side of the hill, before they joined together in a choirs of howls now at a distance.

I woke at sunrise and packed up camp quickly, not sure what my plan was I figured I shouldn’t leave my tent behind just in case. I drove back and forth all morning taking pictures hoping to spot a Sage Grouse or Ferret or Fox, but wasn’t that lucky.

I did spot what I later learned was an American Bittern feeding on insects in a roadside ditch and spent a half hour or so watching the funny looking bird.

Grasslands NP consists of two different areas and I was hoping to visit the second one as well. So when I found a road heading off in that direction I thought I would see where it led. The gravel road quickly turned to a dirt track, and then left the park behind, after a while I started to get nervous, but there was no where to turn around so I kept going, and going, and going.

Two hours later… yes… two extremely nerve-wrecking hours later I finally popped out onto a real gravel road with no idea were I was. Grabbing my gps out of the trunk I turned it on to find out I was literally in the middle of nowhere (If you look at the gps track at the bottom of the page you can see where I was when I turned it on… and how far I now was from the entrance in the southwest corner of the park and access to the campground). I briefly debated continuing on to the eastern park but it was still a long way and with no campground and no Idea what is actually there I was too tired and frustrated to keep exploring, and headed home instead.

Grasslands National Park is an amazing place. Although in all reality I was only in the park for about 12 or 13 hours much of it spent sleeping, I left with a feeling of awe at the place and can’t wait to go back. Next time I will definitely have to plan things a bit better, and probably go later in the year and not alone. Because frankly having an entire National Park to yourself may sound pretty cool (I didn’t see one single other person the whole time in the park), but in all reality it’s kind of creepy.

 

Plains Bison in Grasslands National Park, Saskatchewan, Canada
Plains Bison in Grasslands National Park, Saskatchewan, Canada
Plains Bison in Grasslands National Park, Saskatchewan, Canada
Plains Bison in Grasslands National Park, Saskatchewan, Canada
Plains Bison in Grasslands National Park, Saskatchewan, Canada
Plains Bison in Grasslands National Park, Saskatchewan, Canada
Barn Swallow Perched on a sign, Grasslands National Park Saskatchewan Canada
Barn Swallow Perched on a sign, Grasslands National Park Saskatchewan Canada
White-tailed deer in open prairies at dawn, Grasslands National Park Saskatchewan Canada
White-tailed deer in open prairies at dawn, Grasslands National Park Saskatchewan Canada
Black-tailed Prairie Dogs, Grasslands National Park Saskatchewan Canada
Black-tailed Prairie Dogs, Grasslands National Park Saskatchewan Canada
Plains Bison in Grasslands National Park, Saskatchewan, Canada
Plains Bison in Grasslands National Park, Saskatchewan, Canada
Burrowing Owls, Grasslands National Park Saskatchewan Canada
Burrowing Owls, Grasslands National Park Saskatchewan Canada
Baird's Sparrow, Grasslands National Park Saskatchewan Canada
Baird’s Sparrow, Grasslands National Park Saskatchewan Canada
Sharp-Taied Grouse, Grasslands National Park Saskatchewan Canada
Sharp-Tailed Grouse, Grasslands National Park Saskatchewan Canada
Eastern Kingbird, Grasslands National Park Saskatchewan Canada
Eastern Kingbird, Grasslands National Park Saskatchewan Canada
Western Meadowlark, Grasslands National Park Saskatchewan Canada
Western Meadowlark, Grasslands National Park Saskatchewan Canada
Black-tailed Prairie Dogs, Grasslands National Park Saskatchewan Canada
Black-tailed Prairie Dogs, Grasslands National Park Saskatchewan Canada
Black-tailed Prairie Dogs, Grasslands National Park Saskatchewan Canada
Black-tailed Prairie Dogs, Grasslands National Park Saskatchewan Canada
Plains Bison in Grasslands National Park, Saskatchewan, Canada
Plains Bison in Grasslands National Park, Saskatchewan, Canada
Pronghorn Grasslands National Park Saskatchewan Canada
Pronghorn Grasslands National Park Saskatchewan Canada
Pronghorn Grasslands National Park Saskatchewan Canada
Pronghorn Grasslands National Park Saskatchewan Canada
Burrowing Owls, Grasslands National Park Saskatchewan Canada
Burrowing Owls, Grasslands National Park Saskatchewan Canada
Grasslands National Park Saskatchewan Canada
Grasslands National Park Saskatchewan Canada
Mourning Dove perched on a branch, Grasslands National Park Saskatchewan Canada
Mourning Dove perched on a branch, Grasslands National Park Saskatchewan Canada
Blue-winged Teal in a prairie pond, Alberta Canada
Blue-winged Teal in a prairie pond, Alberta Canada
Burrowing Owls, Grasslands National Park Saskatchewan Canada
Burrowing Owls, Grasslands National Park Saskatchewan Canada
American Bittern hunting among tall grass in a prairie wetland, Grasslands National Park Canada
American Bittern hunting among tall grass in a prairie wetland, Grasslands National Park Canada
American Bittern hunting among tall grass in a prairie wetland, Grasslands National Park Canada
American Bittern hunting among tall grass in a prairie wetland, Grasslands National Park Canada
American Bittern hunting among tall grass in a prairie wetland, Grasslands National Park Canada
American Bittern hunting among tall grass in a prairie wetland, Grasslands National Park Canada
View of the entrance of  Grasslands National Park Saskatchewan Canada
View of the entrance of Grasslands National Park Saskatchewan Canada
Large tree on the side of a country gravel road, Saskatchewan Canada
Large tree on the side of a country gravel road, Saskatchewan Canada
Large tree on the side of a country gravel road, Saskatchewan Canada
Large tree on the side of a country gravel road, Saskatchewan Canada

 

[map style=”width: auto; height:400px; margin:20px 0px 20px 0px; border: 1px solid black;” maptype=”SATELLITE” gpx=”https://photoboom.ca/wp/wp-content/uploads/Grasslands NP 04-13.gpx”]

Kananaskis

I took an afternoon drive out to the Highway 40 side of Kananaskis Country, taking a bit of a scenic route through the farmland west of the city. My goal had been to do some fishing at Buller pond (hoping to repeat the success I had there one night last summer). But it didn’t take long for me to realize that it hadn’t yet been stocked, and it was very unlikely that there were any fish in it (and the weather was kind of awful). On the way back I had a run-in  with a couple of moose and was able to sit and watch them for a long while.

Scenic mountain pond, Kananaskis Country Alberta, Canada
Scenic mountain pond, Kananaskis Country Alberta, Canada
Wild North American Moose, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild North American Moose, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild North American Moose, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild North American Moose, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Gray Jay perched on a pine tree
Gray Jay perched on a pine tree
Pasture farmland in the foothills of Alberta Canada
Pasture farmland in the foothills of Alberta Canada
Tree Swallow perched on a barbed wire fence over a prairie pond
Tree Swallow perched on a barbed wire fence over a prairie pond

Sibbald Meadows – Heron and Osprey

I spent the afternoon fishing and chasing birds around at Sibbald Meadows pond…. (that’s really about all there is to say about that).

Great Blue Heron in flight over a mountain pond, Alberta Canada
Great Blue Heron in flight over a mountain pond, Alberta Canada
Great Blue Heron perched in a pine tree over a mountain pond, Alberta Canada
Great Blue Heron perched in a pine tree over a mountain pond, Alberta Canada
Great Blue Heron wading in a mountain pond, Alberta Canada
Great Blue Heron wading in a mountain pond, Alberta Canada
Wild Osprey perched in a pine tree, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Osprey perched in a pine tree, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Osprey perched in a pine tree, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Osprey perched in a pine tree, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada