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Highway 40 Loop

Highway 40 Loop

Another amazing trip out in Kananaskis Country, I took the entire Highwood loop heading south out of calgary. Shortly after going over the pass I spotted a young grizzly bear on the roadside (almost in the same place as on my previous trip), and spent quite a while photographing it before it wandered off into the trees. By the time I finished with the bear the weather which had started out pretty crappy had blown through, and it turned out to be an absolutely beautiful night.

Scenic mountain views in the Summertime, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
2013 Flood damage to Highway 40, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Scenic mountain views in the Summertime, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Scenic mountain views in the Summertime, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Scenic mountain views in the Summertime, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Scenic mountain views in the Summertime, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Scenic mountain views in the Summertime, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Scenic mountain views in the Summertime, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Scenic mountain views in the Summertime, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Scenic mountain views in the Summertime, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Canadian Moose in the mountains in summer, Kananaskis Country Alberta
Wild Canadian Moose in the mountains in summer, Kananaskis Country Alberta
Columbian ground squirrel in summer Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Columbian ground squirrel in summer Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Scenic mountain views in the Summertime, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Scenic mountain views in the Summertime, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Scenic mountain views in the Summertime, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Scenic mountain views in the Summertime, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Scenic mountain views in the Summertime, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Scenic mountain views in the Summertime, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Scenic mountain views in the Summertime, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Scenic mountain views in the Summertime, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Scenic mountain views in the Summertime, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Scenic mountain views in the Summertime, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Scenic mountain views in the Summertime, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Scenic mountain views in the Summertime, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Scenic mountain views in the Summertime, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Scenic mountain views in the Summertime, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Scenic mountain views in the Summertime, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Scenic mountain views in the Summertime, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Kananaskis Country

Kananaskis Country

Not much to say, sometimes you just have a good day. I found this beauty on the side of Highway 40 and spent literally a couple of hours sitting back in the car watching. There was very little traffic and all the people that stopped to look were unusually respectful, turning off engines and staying in their cars. He/she never appeared to be even the slightest bit stressed out and had no reason to run off.

It was there on the roadside long enough that I eventually left it at one point, but when I ran into a group of Big-Horned Sheep a kilometre or so down the road, heading at a fast pace straight toward the bear I thought I would go back and see what happened. In the end it wasn’t all that exciting. The herd was trotting along down the middle of the road when suddenly all of them stopped in their tracks and looked up at the direction of the bear. There was a pause and then they all turned and ran back in the direction that they had come from. The bear didn’t even notice. In it’s defence I should point out that it was directly up wind of the sheep.

Of all the Bears I’ve seen this was definitely my best encounter to date, and one of the most beautiful example of an Eastern Slope Grizzly Bear I have ever seen.

Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Rocky Mountain Bighorn Sheep in summertime, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Rocky Mountain Bighorn Sheep in summertime, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Rocky Mountain Bighorn Sheep in summertime, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Rocky Mountain Bighorn Sheep in summertime, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Grizzly bear feeding on summer foliage, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Great Blue Heron perched in a pine tree
Great Blue Heron perched in a pine tree

 

Elbow Camp Canyon hike

Elbow Camp Canyon hike

For the first camping trip of the year we (Karl, Steve, Melissa, The Derkowskis, and myself) went to Little Elbow Campground (I think thats what it’s called) along the Elbow River on the Bragg Creek side of Kananaskis Country. We had planned to do this trip the previous year, but the whole area was washed out and closed due to the flooding. In order to avoid the May long weekend crowd we decided to go the next week instead so it made for a nice quiet weekend.

We took a hike west along the river for a ways and then turned and headed up hill to explore a canyon (the name of which I cannot think of right now). It was a nice little hike, although we couldn’t go very far up the canyon because of ice and water that was still left over from the winter. The most interesting part of the hike was surveying all of the damage along the river that was still evident from the previous years flood.

After the hike we met up with Rob and the boys and kicked back for some campfire chili which was a bit of a fiasco because the spice level was completely off the chart. But with a few adjustments, and a loaf of fresh made campfire baked sourdough bread to go with it,  it turned out pretty darn good.

 

Scenic hiking views of the Elbow River Valley Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Scenic hiking views of the Elbow River Valley Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Scenic hiking views of the Elbow River Valley Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Scenic hiking views of the Elbow River Valley Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Scenic hiking views of the Elbow River Valley Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Scenic hiking views of the Elbow River Valley Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Scenic hiking views of the Elbow River Valley Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Scenic hiking views of the Elbow River Valley Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Scenic hiking views of the Elbow River Valley Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Scenic hiking views of the Elbow River Valley Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Scenic hiking views of the Elbow River Valley Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Scenic hiking views of the Elbow River Valley Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Scenic hiking views of the Elbow River Valley Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Scenic hiking views of the Elbow River Valley Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada

American Black Bear and Cub (Ursus americanus)

Scenic hiking views of the Elbow River Valley Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Scenic hiking views of the Elbow River Valley Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Scenic hiking views of the Elbow River Valley Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Scenic hiking views of the Elbow River Valley Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Scenic hiking views of the Elbow River Valley Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Scenic hiking views of the Elbow River Valley Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Scenic hiking views of the Elbow River Valley Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Scenic hiking views of the Elbow River Valley Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Scenic hiking views of the Elbow River Valley Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Scenic hiking views of the Elbow River Valley Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Scenic hiking views of the Elbow River Valley Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Scenic hiking views of the Elbow River Valley Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Scenic hiking views of the Elbow River Valley Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Scenic hiking views of the Elbow River Valley Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada

 

 

Fairmont – British Columbia

Fairmont – British Columbia

I got a really good deal on a week long stay at a place by the Fairmont Hotsprings and headed out for some R&R. I spent the whole day driving out, through Kananaskis and Banff and Kootenay National Parks, stopping first at Gap lake to watch a variety of small songbirds. The weather was beautiful and I had great time exploring the shorelines at various points along the Bow and Kootenay rivers.

Once I got to Fairmont the weather turned rainy and overcast for the next few days, and I spent a lot of time relaxing around the hotel. That’s not to say I didn’t do much, I did a whole lot of driving all over the area. I explored the forestry roads in search of White Swan Lake. Photographed Colombia Lake at sunset. Drove a dirt track on the south side of the river valley halfway to Golden (and then continued on the rest of the way on the highway). Went hiking down to a old gold miners camp along a small creek. Walked around Canal flats where an old canal had been dug between Columbia Lake and the river which is in a different watershed.

I had really been hopeful that I would see some wildlife, but it was a bit of a letdown. The marshes and ponds were strangely devoid of waterfowl (despite it being the annual bird festival in the area). I did spot a black bear about 2 kilometres from the hotel after driving all the way to Golden and back without seeing anything. I had on my wide lens and after it crossed the road in front of my car I watched it from a stand up and scratch its back on a telephone pole while I was fumbling around with my camera, and of course it was gone by the time I got my long lens on.

I spent a lot of time driving up and down some sketchy forestry roads, but apart from a couple of deer and a huge flock of Coots in one of the mountain lakes it was entirely unproductive.

The highlight was an afternoon spent in the reed beds near Canal Flats, which was full of  of Great Blue Herons. The light was pretty crappy so I was excited to go back the next day, but the Heron’s were mostly all gone.

As far as photography goes the way there and back again through Banff and Kananaskis was likely more productive than all the time I spent in BC, but I read an entire book about Coastal Wolves and spent more than a few hours in the jacuzzi tub. So I guess it was a successful trip.

 

 

Mount Yamnuska

Mount Yamnuska

Ravens End – Mount Yamnuska – Mount John Laurie

  • 8 Kilometres Return (more like 7 if you don’t get lost and wander off in the wrong direction)

  • 550 Metre Elevation Gain

After spending the weekend in Banff I had planned to meet up on sunday morning with some friends to go hiking at Mount Yamnuska. I was up early and decided to take a quick drive down the Bow Valley Parkway to Lake Louis in search of wildlife before meeting up with them. By the time I got to Yamnuska I was way behind schedule and could see by the cars in the parking lot that they had already headed up the trail. I figured I was probably only twenty minutes or so behind them and could likely catch up as they had children with them. But instead I ended up taking a wrong turn and ended up wandering off in the wrong direction for a while (which became rather evident when the trail ended at a barbed-wire fence).

I did finally catch up to them at the top (aka. Raven’s End, aka. the chimney, aka. the point). They had gone on a little bit further past the chimney and I was waiting there when they came back through (wondering if they had come back down and passed by me while I was on the wrong trail).

Yamnuska is basically a staple for hiking around Calgary. I think this was the fourth or fifth time I’ve been up to the chimney. But it is a really good hike with great views looking out east over the prairies. It also has the added advantage of a slightly longer hiking season than a lot of the hikes that are higher up in the mountains.

 

Scenic Hiking views from the Mount John Laurie area of Kananaskis Country in the Alberta Foothills
Scenic Hiking views from the Mount John Laurie area of Kananaskis Country in the Alberta Foothills
Scenic Hiking views from the Mount John Laurie area of Kananaskis Country in the Alberta Foothills
Scenic Hiking views from the Mount John Laurie area of Kananaskis Country in the Alberta Foothills
Scenic Hiking views from the Mount John Laurie area of Kananaskis Country in the Alberta Foothills
Scenic Hiking views from the Mount John Laurie area of Kananaskis Country in the Alberta Foothills
Scenic Hiking views from the Mount John Laurie area of Kananaskis Country in the Alberta Foothills
Scenic Hiking views from the Mount John Laurie area of Kananaskis Country in the Alberta Foothills

 

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Jura Canyon

Jura Canyon

Jura Canyon

  • Distance – Return – 6 km
  • Elevation Gain – 144 metres

I wasn’t overly sure I was feeling up to a hike when I parked my car in front of the cement plant on the side of Highway 1A. The wind was blowing so strong it slammed my car door closed on me as I was trying to get my pack ready, which is never a good sign. But I had been promised it was an easy hike, and that there would be Poutine at the end of it so off I went.

The hike was fairly straight forward following up a dry streambed to the top where it comes out through a narrow rock-walled canyon. Which is apparently a lot of fun in the summer when you can wade in the pools and climb all over the canyon. But in October it was mostly dry and what water there was was icy cold and half frozen. Still we had fun climbing around the canyon walls trying to avoid getting wet.

One of the more interesting parts of the hike was to see not only all of the damage caused by the recent floods, but also to see what they had done to deal with future flooding. The streambed we followed up to the canyon, despite now being completely dry, had apparently flooded quite severely and they had come in with graters and earthmovers and cut a massive channel down the mountainside that could probably hold the entire flow of the Bow River.

The weather had improved quite a lot by the time we got back the cars, so after the obligatory stop in Canmore for poutine I decided to make a quick, although not very productive trip up Highway 40.

Hiking views Jura Canyon, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Hiking views Jura Canyon, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Hiking views Jura Canyon, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Hiking views Jura Canyon, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Scenic Mountain Views Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Scenic Mountain Views Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Moose in a mountain meadow
Wild Moose in a mountain meadow

 

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Autumn at Elbow Lake

Autumn at Elbow Lake

Another beautiful day at Elbow Lake…

A bit of a hike, a couple of fish. What more can I ask for…

I’ll spare you the details as I’ve covered Elbow Lake a few times already…

Scenic Mountain Views, Elbow Lake area, Peter Lougheed Provincial Park, Alberta Canada
Scenic Mountain Views, Elbow Lake area, Peter Lougheed Provincial Park, Alberta Canada
Scenic Mountain Views, Elbow Lake area, Peter Lougheed Provincial Park, Alberta Canada
Scenic Mountain Views, Elbow Lake area, Peter Lougheed Provincial Park, Alberta Canada
Scenic Mountain Views, Elbow Lake area, Peter Lougheed Provincial Park, Alberta Canada
Scenic Mountain Views, Elbow Lake area, Peter Lougheed Provincial Park, Alberta Canada
Scenic Mountain Views, Elbow Lake area, Peter Lougheed Provincial Park, Alberta Canada
Scenic Mountain Views, Elbow Lake area, Peter Lougheed Provincial Park, Alberta Canada

 

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.

Bolton Creek – Camping

Bolton Creek – Camping

We were a bit slow getting out of town and it was mid afternoon by the time we got to the Bolton Creek Campground. The weather was pretty crappy and it was drizzling a little bit so the first thing we did was string a tarp up over the picnic table… Then it rained… and rained… and rained… and we sat for a couple of hours on top of the table under a tarp that leaked like a seive and was too small to cover the benches of the the table, and watched it rain.

Eventually it lessend a little bit and we were able to get the tent and the rest of camp set up before running down to the camp store to buy a new non-leaking much larger tarp.

On the way out of town we had stopped at the grocery store with no particular meal plan, and after a bit of discussion decided that beef stew should be fairly easy in the camp pot, so we bought;

  • one onion
  • two carrots
  • two potatoes
  • one bulb of garlic
  • one pack of stewing beef
  • one bag of mushrooms
  • one carton of Beef Stock

Back at camp we threw it all in the pot over the fire and let it cook nice and slow, realizing a good stew needs to be a bit thicker than just beef stock I toasted up a hot dog bun and crumbled it into the pot. Maybe I was just cold and wet and hungry, but by the time we sat down to eat at about eleven o’clock at night (do to the fact that it took all afternoon to get the fire going in the rain), it was quite possibly the best bowl of stew I’ve ever eaten.

The rest of the trip was entirely uneventful. That being said there is something strangely enjoyable and relaxing to spending an evening with friends while sitting under a tarp in the pouring rain.

Mountain views, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Mountain views, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Mountain views, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Mountain views, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Pika at Rawson Lake

Pika at Rawson Lake

Rawson Lake 

  • 8 Kilometres Return
  • 280 Metre Elevation Gain

After my first trip to Rawson Lake back in 2011 (read my previous my more detailed post about the hike here.. http://photoboom.ca/wp/?p=3129), I’ve been wanting to go back for a number of reasons. The first of which was for the pikas. There is a huge talus field running along the south side the lake, and on my previous trip I could hear the high pitched whistles of the small rodents all over the mountain side. Although I know of a couple other places were pikas can be found (there’s a small colony on the way to Elbow Lake), but the one at Rawson Lake is far larger and more populated than most. The pikas are a small animal, and although I’ve been able to get close to some in the past, they are quite small and I was never able to get close enough with my 200 mm lens to satisfy me. So, armed with my 500 mm lens I was looking forward to getting some nice close up shots.

After lugging my heavy lens up to the lake we were not disappointed, they were literally all over place, running back and forth collecting foliage for their winter stores.

The second reason I wanted to go back there was to do some more fishing at such a beautiful mountain lake. That being said I ended up having so much fun photographing the pikas that I never really ended up doing much fishing.

I made two major mistakes on this trip up to the lake. The first was not bringing my tripod, it’s heavy and awkward, and I didn’t want to pack it the 280 metres of elevation up the mountainside to the lake. It would definitely have been worth the effort to bring it as they are fast moving little animals, and with the lake sinking into the shade of the mountain so early the extra stability in low light would have been helpful. The second mistake was to go so late in the day, Mount Sarrail towers so high and close to the west side of the lake that the sun slips behind it so early we didn’t have much time to enjoy the beautiful autumn day.

By the time we got back to the shores of Upper Kananaskis Lake, the sun was finally setting for real, and we were able to catch one of the most impressive mountain sunsets I’ve ever seen. Once again, I was left wishing I had brought my tripod.

Wild Pika feeding on grass in a talus field, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Pika feeding on grass in a talus field, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Pika feeding on grass in a talus field, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Pika feeding on grass in a talus field, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Pika feeding on grass in a talus field, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Pika feeding on grass in a talus field, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Pika feeding on grass in a talus field, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Pika feeding on grass in a talus field, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Mountain views, Rawson Lake, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Mountain views, Rawson Lake, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Mountain sunset over Kananaskis Lake, Alberta Canada
Mountain sunset over Kananaskis Lake, Alberta Canada
Mountain sunset over Kananaskis Lake, Alberta Canada
Mountain sunset over Kananaskis Lake, Alberta Canada
Mountain sunset over Kananaskis Lake, Alberta Canada
Mountain sunset over Kananaskis Lake, Alberta Canada

 

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Kananaskis Country

Kananaskis Country

Another great drive down Highway 40 and Spray Lakes Trail in Kananaskis Country, with a rather cute Bighorn Sheep near Galatea trailhead, a Moose in the meadows by Mount Shark, and a somewhat ugly Cinnamon Black Bear feeding on berries near the shores of Spray Lake….

 

Young Rocky Mountain Bighorn Sheep Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Young Rocky Mountain Bighorn Sheep Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Young Rocky Mountain Bighorn Sheep Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Young Rocky Mountain Bighorn Sheep Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild moose feeding among bushes, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild moose feeding among bushes, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Cinnamon coloured Black Bear feeding on berries, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Cinnamon coloured Black Bear feeding on berries, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Cinnamon coloured Black Bear feeding on berries, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Cinnamon coloured Black Bear feeding on berries, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Bolton Creek Kananaskis – Camping

Bolton Creek Kananaskis – Camping

I headed out early to Kananaskis country to take pictures, and had after a run-in with a Ruffed grouse and a couple of deer, on the Jumpingpound road (Hwy 68?) I headed up along the #40 to the lakes and shooting pictures along the way. Eventually the weather turned and it clouded up and started to drizzle. So I thought I would stop by Bolton Creek Campground where my sister was camping with a couple of friends. I ended up staying the night (there are benefits to keeping all of your camp gear in the trunk of your car).

I woke the next morning to the sound of rain, which cleared up shortly after, so we decided we’d go for a quick hike, and headed out for the Mt. Everest Expedition Trail, which is basically just a 2 kilometer walk to a lookout point over Kananaskis Lakes.

I also spent a bit of time wandering and photographing the shoreline of the lakes and assessing the damage caused by the recent floods . Then after packing up camp I decided I might was well take the long route back down spray lakes trail, where I spotted a Great Blue Heron out on the lake standing on a old rotten tree stump a few metres from shore.

 

White-tailed deer in tall summer grass, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
White-tailed deer in tall summer grass, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Ruffed Grouse on a roadside in the foothills, Alberta Canada
Ruffed Grouse on a roadside in the foothills, Alberta Canada
Scenic mountain pond, Kananaskis Country Alberta, Canada
Scenic mountain pond, Kananaskis Country Alberta, Canada
Scenic mountain lake, Kananaskis Country Alberta, Canada
Scenic mountain lake, Kananaskis Country Alberta, Canada
Scenic mountain lake, Kananaskis Country Alberta, Canada
Scenic mountain lake, Kananaskis Country Alberta, Canada
Scenic mountain lake, Kananaskis Country Alberta, Canada
Scenic mountain lake, Kananaskis Country Alberta, Canada
Scenic mountain views, Kananaskis Country Alberta, Canada
Scenic mountain views, Kananaskis Country Alberta, Canada
Scenic mountain lake, Kananaskis Country Alberta, Canada
Scenic mountain lake, Kananaskis Country Alberta, Canada
Scenic mountain lake, Kananaskis Country Alberta, Canada
Scenic mountain lake, Kananaskis Country Alberta, Canada
Scenic mountain views, Kananaskis Country Alberta, Canada
Scenic mountain views, Kananaskis Country Alberta, Canada
Scenic mountain views, Kananaskis Country Alberta, Canada
Scenic mountain views, Kananaskis Country Alberta, Canada
Scenic mountain lake, Kananaskis Country Alberta, Canada
Scenic mountain lake, Kananaskis Country Alberta, Canada
Scenic mountain lake, Kananaskis Country Alberta, Canada
Scenic mountain lake, Kananaskis Country Alberta, Canada
Great Blue Heron wading in a mountain pond, Alberta Canada
Great Blue Heron on a old tree stump, Spray Lakes, Alberta Canada

 

 

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Kananaskis – Flood 2013

Kananaskis – Flood 2013

In the last week or so of June 2013 Calgary had its worst flood in well…. ever… with both rivers spilling over their banks and flowing through much of downtown. But you probably know all this so that’s about all I’m gonna say about it (here’s some more info if you don’t know all about it… http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/2013_Alberta_floods).

Anyway things were pretty crazy in town, but in all reality it didn’t affect me in the least little bit, in fact I never even saw any of the flood water or river until about a week after it had crested. But as soon as the roads began reopen in Kananaskis country I knew I had to head out to have a look at the damage.

The damage was pretty crazy to see… tiny little streams had cut 20 foot chasms into hillsides and stripped shorelines of trees and plants and soil in huge swaths and ripping roads and bridges right off their foundations. What was really amazing was to see just how much earth the water had moved, roadside ditches that had been 10 feet deep were now filled to road level with dirty or gravel, and whole hillside that used to overlook the iver were simply not there anymore. At one point on the Spray Lakes trail I got out to take a walk along the stream that runs parallel to the road. The first thing I noticed was how wide the stream-bed was, it had probably only been about 10 feet across before the flood, but was now more like 40 or 50 feet across, with the bank on the other side made up of a wall of freshly exposed soil. But what really got me was the smell. The smell of pine coming from the hundreds or thousands of twisted, broken, and downed pine trees that lined the sides of the shore was so strong it literally made my eyes water and burned my sinuses, it was really quite remarkable.

Looking back (yes it’s almost a year later that I’m writing this), whats really crazy to think about is just how long the scars of that flood will be present, the debris and sticks and branches and mud stuck ten feet high in the trees will likely take a good 5 years to be dislodge and washed completely away. The piles of broken and downed trees might be recognizable for a decade or two or three. The changed in the course of the rivers and streams, and the deposits of gravel and dirt and boulders might take a few decades to become healed to the point where they no longer look like a visible scar on the landscape, but in all reality they might be there for a few centuries or longer, or basically forever, at least until the next big flood. Or until we decide to pave over them and put in a new parking lot.

Flood Damage on a mountain stream Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada, 2013
Flood Damage on a mountain stream Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada, 2013
Sibbald Meadows – Moose

Sibbald Meadows – Moose

Rule #1… Always have your camera ready…

I headed out to do some fishing at Sibbald meadows Pond, and shortly after turning off the highway I was thinking I should pull over and put my long lens on the camera when I spotted this big beautiful (if somewhat shaggy) moose standing knee deep in a marsh with a mouthful of grass staring straight at me… And my camera was still in the bag. It was easily the most iconic moose scene I’ve ever witnessed, and I totally missed it.  I stopped in the middle of the road and tried to gear up as quick as I could and got off a couple shots before it headed off away from the road. But it doesn’t really do justice to the original scene.

I don’t think I caught any fish on this particular evening, but a moose sighting, as well as some bluebirds I had been meaning to photograph (there’s a section of the road to the pond lined with nesting boxes), made for a nice evening out..

Wild North American Moose, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild North American Moose, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Male Mountain Bluebird on a barbed wire fence post
Male Mountain Bluebird on a barbed wire fence post
Osprey in a pine tree, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Osprey in a pine tree, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Tree Swallow perched on a fence post
Tree Swallow perched on a fence post
Kananaskis

Kananaskis

I took an afternoon drive out to the Highway 40 side of Kananaskis Country, taking a bit of a scenic route through the farmland west of the city. My goal had been to do some fishing at Buller pond (hoping to repeat the success I had there one night last summer). But it didn’t take long for me to realize that it hadn’t yet been stocked, and it was very unlikely that there were any fish in it (and the weather was kind of awful). On the way back I had a run-in  with a couple of moose and was able to sit and watch them for a long while.

Scenic mountain pond, Kananaskis Country Alberta, Canada
Scenic mountain pond, Kananaskis Country Alberta, Canada
Wild North American Moose, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild North American Moose, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild North American Moose, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild North American Moose, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Gray Jay perched on a pine tree
Gray Jay perched on a pine tree
Pasture farmland in the foothills of Alberta Canada
Pasture farmland in the foothills of Alberta Canada
Tree Swallow perched on a barbed wire fence over a prairie pond
Tree Swallow perched on a barbed wire fence over a prairie pond
Sibbald Meadows – Heron and Osprey

Sibbald Meadows – Heron and Osprey

I spent the afternoon fishing and chasing birds around at Sibbald Meadows pond…. (that’s really about all there is to say about that).

Great Blue Heron in flight over a mountain pond, Alberta Canada
Great Blue Heron in flight over a mountain pond, Alberta Canada
Great Blue Heron perched in a pine tree over a mountain pond, Alberta Canada
Great Blue Heron perched in a pine tree over a mountain pond, Alberta Canada
Great Blue Heron wading in a mountain pond, Alberta Canada
Great Blue Heron wading in a mountain pond, Alberta Canada
Wild Osprey perched in a pine tree, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Osprey perched in a pine tree, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Osprey perched in a pine tree, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Wild Osprey perched in a pine tree, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Springtime in Kananaskis Country

Springtime in Kananaskis Country

I started out in the prairies, watching swallows (which are almost impossible to photography) working on their nest at one of the roadside birdhouses. After that I headed up through Jumpingpound spotting Buffleheads and Goldeneyes in one of the ponds along the way. Next it was a White-Crowned Sparrow (my first), when I stopped to use the washroom at Mount Lorette Ponds.

When I left town the weather was pretty crappy, windy and cloudy, and not very nice, but the further I got into mountains the nicer it got. By the time I made it to the Shark Mountain turn-off on Spray-Lakes trail it was a beautiful spring evening. While there was still snow higher-up, it was great to see the rivers and streams had already thawed and were flowing high with spring melt.

On the return trip I spotted a pair of Grizzlies (mother and cub), walking down highway 40 from what must have been at least a kilometre or two in the distance. Cutting the engine I coasted down the hill doing my best not to spook them, but a winters worth of gravel on the roadway grinding under my tires was enough to scare them off the road before I could get very close. Thankfully I had my long lens and 1.4X on and was able to get some great shots of them crossing the road and climbing over the guard rail.

After leaving the road they climbed down the embankment, and I spent a half hour or so before it got too dark watching them (from a really bad angle) while they fed on new spring growth.

There was an Elk on the hillside about 20 metres behind them, and neither the bear nor the Elk even blinked at the others presence, they just kept on grazing. I found this very interesting, because everyone knows bears are blood thirsty carnivorous that kill everything they see…

 

Tree Swallow (Tachycineta bicolor)
Tree Swallow (Tachycineta bicolor)
Tree Swallow (Tachycineta bicolor)
Tree Swallow (Tachycineta bicolor)

 

Bufflehead (Bucephala albeola)
Bufflehead (Bucephala albeola)
Barrow's Goldeneye (Bucephala islandica)
Barrow’s Goldeneye (Bucephala islandica)

White-crowned Sparrow (Zonotrichia leucophrys)White-crowned Sparrow (Zonotrichia leucophrys)

Mountains in Spring
Mountains in Spring
Mountains in Spring
Mountains in Spring
Mountains in Spring
Mountains in Spring
Mountains in Spring
Mountains in Spring
Mountains in Spring
Mountains in Spring
Mountains in Spring
Mountains in Spring
Grizzly Bear (Ursus arctos horribilis)
Grizzly Bear (Ursus arctos horribilis)
Grizzly Bear (Ursus arctos horribilis)
Grizzly Bear (Ursus arctos horribilis)
Grizzly Bear (Ursus arctos horribilis)
Grizzly Bear (Ursus arctos horribilis)
Grizzly Bear (Ursus arctos horribilis)
Grizzly Bear (Ursus arctos horribilis)
Grizzly Bear (Ursus arctos horribilis)
Grizzly Bear (Ursus arctos horribilis)
Grizzly Bear (Ursus arctos horribilis)
Grizzly Bear Cub (Ursus arctos horribilis)
Grizzly Bear (Ursus arctos horribilis)
Grizzly Bear Cub (Ursus arctos horribilis)
Grizzly Bear (Ursus arctos horribilis)
Grizzly Bear Cub (Ursus arctos horribilis)
Grizzly Bear (Ursus arctos horribilis)
Grizzly Bear Cub (Ursus arctos horribilis)
Grizzly Bear (Ursus arctos horribilis)
Grizzly Bear Cub (Ursus arctos horribilis)
Grizzly Bear (Ursus arctos horribilis)
Grizzly Bear (Ursus arctos horribilis)
Elk  (Cervus canadensis)
Elk (Cervus canadensis)
Grizzly Bear (Ursus arctos horribilis)
Grizzly Bear (Ursus arctos horribilis)
Grizzly Bear (Ursus arctos horribilis)
Grizzly Bear (Ursus arctos horribilis)
Grizzly Bear (Ursus arctos horribilis)
Grizzly Bear mother and Cub (Ursus arctos horribilis)
Grizzly Bear (Ursus arctos horribilis)
Grizzly Bear Cub (Ursus arctos horribilis)
Grizzly Bear (Ursus arctos horribilis)
Grizzly Bear mother and Cub (Ursus arctos horribilis)
Grizzly Bear (Ursus arctos horribilis)
Grizzly Bear Mother and Cub (Ursus arctos horribilis)
Rocky Mountain Big Horned Sheep
Rocky Mountain Big Horned Sheep
Mountains in Spring
Mountains in Spring
Mountains in Spring
Mountains in Spring
Swans

Swans

There is a pond on the north side of the Trans-Canada Highway just before the Jumping-pound exit, that for whatever reason draws a group of Trumpeter Swans every spring. While most of the time I’m speeding by on the highway and just get a glimpse of them, today I thought I should take the time to try and get some photos.

To put it bluntly, it was so cold and windy that I could hardly hold the camera still, the light was terrible, the Swans were filthy, and they swam off to the far side of the pond as soon as I pulled up.

Not my best photo stop, but at least I tried, and well there’s always next year.

Trumpeter Swans (Cygnus buccinator)
Trumpeter Swans
Trumpeter Swans (Cygnus buccinator)
Trumpeter Swans
Trumpeter Swans (Cygnus buccinator)
Trumpeter Swans
Trumpeter Swans (Cygnus buccinator)
Trumpeter Swans
Trumpeter Swans (Cygnus buccinator)
Trumpeter Swans
Trumpeter Swans (Cygnus buccinator)
Trumpeter Swans
Trumpeter Swans (Cygnus buccinator)
Trumpeter Swans

Chester Lake Kananaskis – Snowshoeing

Chester Lake Kananaskis – Snowshoeing

Chester Lake

  • Distance – Return – 8 km
  • Elevation Gain – 311 metres

The weekend weather forecast was looking especially nice for February so I headed out just after sunrise for a drive through the mountains (I was trying to get out there before sunrise but as usual I seem to be incapable of actually getting out of town before dawn).

It wasn’t particularly nice out when I started out on Highway 40, it was cloudy, overcast, and snowing a little, and when I spotted a moose sleeping in the ditch in front of Boundary Ranch I stopped to shoot some photos, but between the weather and the shadow of the mountain the light was sub-par to say the least.

Shortly after I left the moose though the sun broke through the clouds and lit up the western range on the opposite side of the highway, and suddenly it was a beautiful winter morning. Stopping frequently to shoot pictures I made my way down the 40 and towards Canmore on the Spray Lakes Trail. The meadow at Mount Shark was looking particularly great with a smooth covering of drifted snow and the snaking line of the creek running through it.

By the time I hit the trailhead to Chester Lake I was feeling so inspired that I decided to throw on my snowshoes and go for a bit of an impromptu hike.

Chester Lake has been at the top of my list for a long time, yet despite trying on multiple occasions (it’s closed in the spring to stop trail erosion, and has a very healthy bear population which causes frequent closures in the summer time), I have never managed to make it there.

The hike to Chester Lake starts out climbing uphill on a wide well used trail through the forest. Though not particularly difficult the trail is steep enough to get the blood pumping, after climbing steadily for about three kilometres the trail flattens out and enters into a large open meadow. The wind was blowing hard and it was snowing and quite miserable when I got to the meadow and after a quick look I almost turned around and headed back down, mistaking the snow covered meadow for the lake. But I spotted some skiers (there was a large group of them doing avalanche safety) on the other side of the opening and realized my mistake. Eventually I did make it to the lake (it’s another kilometre or so through the open mostly level meadow to the lake), but didn’t stay long as it was getting late in the day and the weather was looked like it was getting worse.

As usually happens the sky had cleared up nicely by the time I got back to my car and I figured I might as well keep the day going and headed into Banff for a few more photos and nice long soak in the hot tub.


Sleeping Moose Winter in the mountains Winter in the mountains Winter in the mountains Winter in the mountains Winter in the mountains Winter in the mountains Winter in the mountains Winter in the mountains Winter in the mountains Winter in the mountains Winter in the mountains Winter in the mountains Winter in the mountains Winter in the mountainsWinter in the mountainsWinter in the mountainsResting ElkWinter in the mountainsWinter in the mountains

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Kananaskis

Kananaskis

After hibernating through the first few weeks of the year cabin fever finally got the better of me, so I got up early and headed out towards Spray Lakes in Kananaskis Country to see what I could find.

All I can say is I didn’t find much at all. It was pretty much a whiteout as I headed up the hill from Canmore and along the side of the lake. As far a wildlife goes the one and only highlight was a squirrel sitting on its pile of pine cone debris. Once I hit highway 40 the snow had stopped, and the sky clearing slightly, but it was still painfully cold and windy so the few times I did stop it was short lived and not very productive.

 

Winter in the Mountains
Snow falling over Spray Lakes
Winter in the Mountains
Winter storm
Winter Squirrel
Squirrel at the dinner table
Winter in the Mountains
Mount Lorette Pond in winter
Mountain Waterfall
Waterfall on the side of Highway 40
Mountain Waterfall
Waterfall in winter
Winter in the Mountains
Mount Lorette Pond

Snowshoeing – Sawmill Trail Kananaskis Country

Snowshoeing – Sawmill Trail Kananaskis Country

  • Distance – Sawmill Snowshoe Loop – 5.07 km
  • Elevation Gain – 143 metres

On my last trip up to Bow Lake I found myself standing in the parking lot looking out across a field of snow that was at least five feet deep, and it suddenly occurred to me that I needed to buy snowshoes.

After looking around a bit I found a pair on sale for half price (thank you Black Friday) at Atmosphere, and decided to put aside my prejudiced of the Forzani Group (I don’t support them because they always mis-represent sales and all sorts of other dirty selling tricks….. and surprise they did it to me again…. but despite that it was still a great deal).

Anyway, the point is I bought a pair of snowshoes, and after starring at them on the living room floor for about a month I finally had a chance to try them out.

I wanted to try and get a picture of the Three Sisters Mountains from across Gap Lake on Highway 1A, and for what may be the first time ever I actually made it out there in the dark and was ready to go as the sun broke the horizon. Of course that never actually happened, because it was cloudy and overcast and colourless, and the mountains weren’t even visible across the lake. Not only that, but it was about fifteen below zero and the wind was so strong I only lasted about ten minutes outside (it was so windy that my tripod and camera went sliding across the ice in the middle of a shot, and I had to run out onto the lake after it, thankfully I had the tripod as low as it would go, and it never fell over).

After complete failure at Gap Lake I headed through Canmore and up the Spray Lakes Trail looking for wildlife, which I found absolutely none. It was cloudy and snowy the whole way with pretty much nothing to be seen. Eventually I made it to the Burstall Lakes parking area, where I was planning to give snowshoeing a try, but before I managed to get out of the car a half dozen SUVs pulled in behind me and what seemed like a hundred people piled out with cross-country skis.

So I left….

The next stop on the road was the Sawmill Trail, and after a quick look at the trail map I figured it was a good place for a first try.

I spent a good ten minutes in the parking lot trying to figuring out how to get the snowshoes on (apparently that wasn’t long enough, because about halfway through the hike one fell off and I realised I had it completely wrong). Eventually I made it onto the trail and headed into the forest. The trail was groomed which I thought was really silly at first, because why bother with snowshoes if the trail is groomed. But then later when it (the snowshoe) fell off in mid stride and I sunk hip deep in the middle of the trail I changed my mind about that.

When I first started out I was really surprised by how easy it was, and after a few minutes hardly even noticed I was wearing snowshoes. My favourite part was running downhill off-trail in deep powder sinking and sliding a foot or two with each step, it was a lot of fun.

The hike itself was nice, but not very exciting, although I think there may have been some nice mountain views (it was snowing the whole time, and  I only caught a glimpse or two of the surrounding mountains), the trail was forested the entire way, with no room to get a decent scenic photo. There’s a couple of different trail options, the distance posted is only one possible route.

Although conditions could have been a whole lot better, and the trail wasn’t anything special  it was a fantastic first try with the snowshoes, and I was defiantly impressed by the experience.

***Note to self…… Wear less clothes (it may have been cold in the parking lot, but five minutes up the trail I was stripping off layers and sweating like crazy)!

As far as photography goes, it was a pretty awful day, although I blame the weather for   much of it, I now know that I have a lot to learn about winter photography.

Gap Lake in winter, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Gap Lake in winter, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Gap Lake in winter, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Gap Lake in winter, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Gap Lake in winter, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Gap Lake in winter, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Sawmill snowshoe trail - Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Sawmill snowshoe trail – Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Sawmill snowshoe trail - Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Sawmill snowshoe trail – Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Sawmill snowshoe trail - Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Sawmill snowshoe trail – Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Sawmill snowshoe trail - Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Sawmill snowshoe trail – Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Sawmill snowshoe trail - Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Sawmill snowshoe trail – Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Sawmill snowshoe trail - Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Sawmill snowshoe trail – Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada

Created by My Tracks on Android.

Total distance: 5.07 km (3.2 mi)
Total time: 1:38:50
Moving time: 46:59
Average speed: 3.08 km/h (1.9 mi/h)
Average moving speed: 6.48 km/h (4.0 mi/h)
Max speed: 9.00 km/h (5.6 mi/h)
Average pace: 19.49 min/km (31.4 min/mi)
Average moving pace: 9.27 min/km (14.9 min/mi)
Min pace: 6.67 min/km (10.7 min/mi)
Max elevation: 1953 m (6409 ft)
Min elevation: 1810 m (5938 ft)
Elevation gain: 208 m (682 ft)
Max grade: 0 %
Min grade: 0 %
Recorded: 16-12-2012 10:17
Activity type: – Snowshoeing

saawmillsnowshoe


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