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Kananaskis Country

Kananaskis Country

Still waiting for spring….

I drove out to Kananaskis Country, taking the long way through Springbank, to exploring some of the backcountry roads to try and photograph waterfowl in the country ponds. It wasn’t very successful and the weather was beginning to turn rather ugly. By the time I got into Kananaskis Country I realised that spring was still a long way off in the mountains and headed back early, deciding not waste anymore time.

 

Snowy mountain scenery in early springtime
Snowy mountain scenery in early springtime
Snowy mountain scenery in early springtime
Snowy mountain scenery in early springtime
Snowy mountain scenery in early springtime
Snowy mountain scenery in early springtime
Ring-necked Ducks in a farmland slough
Ring-necked Ducks in a farmland slough
Banff National Park

Banff National Park

I went out to Banff for my annual February weekend at the timeshare. The weather was icy cold, despite the beautiful clear blue skies. We did a lot of driving around looking for wildlife. The first night there I spotted a bunch of Elk up on tunnel mountain drive and nearly died of hypothermia (ok not really) trying to photograph them. The light was on it’s way out so I had to get out of the car to use my tripod, although I think my shivering negated most of its effects. The next day we spotted a coyote walking down the railroad track off to the side of the Bow Valley Parkway. We made the usual stops at Vermilion Lakes and Castle Mountain. But it was too cold to really do a whole lot and we spent more time in the hot tub and lounging around the hotel than we did out taking pictures.

 

Wild Elk herd, Banff National Park Alberta Canada in winter
Wild Elk herd, Banff National Park Alberta Canada in winter
Wild Elk herd, Banff National Park Alberta Canada in winter
Wild Elk herd, Banff National Park Alberta Canada in winter
Wild Elk herd, Banff National Park Alberta Canada in winter
Wild Elk herd, Banff National Park Alberta Canada in winter
Snow covered winter mountain views, Banff National Park Alberta Canada
Snow covered winter mountain views, Banff National Park Alberta Canada
Wild Coyote in a field of snow, Banff National Park Alberta Canada
Wild Coyote in a field of snow, Banff National Park Alberta Canada
Scenic Mount Rundle and Vermillion lakes in winter, Banff National Park Alberta Canada
Scenic Mount Rundle and Vermillion lakes in winter, Banff National Park Alberta Canada
Scenic Mount Rundle and Vermillion lakes in winter, Banff National Park Alberta Canada
Scenic Mount Rundle and Vermillion lakes in winter, Banff National Park Alberta Canada
Scenic Bow river and Castle Mountain in winter, Banff National Park Alberta Canada
Scenic Bow river and Castle Mountain in winter, Banff National Park Alberta Canada
Sun setting over snow covered forest, Banff National Park Alberta Canada
Sun setting over snow covered forest, Banff National Park Alberta Canada
Scenic Bow river and Castle Mountain in winter, Banff National Park Alberta Canada
Scenic Bow river and Castle Mountain in winter, Banff National Park Alberta Canada
Hinton South

Hinton South

After a mostly uneventful day in Jasper I thought that rather than trying to shoot ugly scenery under grey overcast skies I would spend the day exploring the unknown stretch of Highway 40 between Hinton and Rocky Mountain House (I’ve previously driven the stretch from Highway 1, to Rocky Mountain House, and from Highway 1 all the way south to Highway 3 in the Crowsnest Pass and the US border).

As expected it was a long day of driving, with more than a few rather sketchy sections with the highway winding around and in a few cases making use of what must have been little more than forestry logging roads.

The weather was such that there was very little opportunity for any kind of landscape photography, and for most of the day you could hardly see the mountains at all.

I did have a couple of run-ins with some large groups of both Big-Horned Sheep and Elk, which is always fun.

What I found really interesting was how much industry is going on up there, with coal mines and logging operations all over the place.

Overall it was another pretty uneventful day, but I could imagine the drive being a lot more interesting and enjoyable on a sunny summer day.

Rocky Mountain Big Horned Sheep Rocky Mountain Big Horned Sheep Coal Mine Coal Mine Rocky Mountain Big Horned Sheep Elk  (Cervus canadensis) Elk  (Cervus canadensis) Elk  (Cervus canadensis) Rocky Mountain Big Horned Sheep Rocky Mountain Big Horned Sheep Rocky Mountain Big Horned Sheep

Banff

Banff

Every year I get to spend a couple days in Banff during the last week of February. This year I spent most of it in driving up and down the Parkway, and south on the #93 all the way to Radium and back in search of wildlife, and didn’t see so much as a single deer. To make matters worse the weather was cold and dark and cloudy and entirely un-photogenic.  I did a short hike along the shore of lake Minnewanka (to the caynon bridge and back), and spent some time playing around on the cracked ice and rocky outcroppings and of the lake. On the last day the weather finally did clear up just before sunset, and I had just enough time to race down to Vermillion lakes to snap a few pictures.

Winter in the mountains Winter in the mountains Winter in the mountains Winter in the mountains Winter in the mountains Winter in the mountains Winter in the mountains Winter in the mountains Winter in the mountains Winter in the mountains Winter in the mountains Winter in the mountains Winter in the mountains Winter in the mountains Winter in the mountains Winter in the mountains Winter in the mountains

 

Playing around with my GPS and Lightroom….. LR Map Capture

Chester Lake Kananaskis – Snowshoeing

Chester Lake Kananaskis – Snowshoeing

Chester Lake

  • Distance – Return – 8 km
  • Elevation Gain – 311 metres

The weekend weather forecast was looking especially nice for February so I headed out just after sunrise for a drive through the mountains (I was trying to get out there before sunrise but as usual I seem to be incapable of actually getting out of town before dawn).

It wasn’t particularly nice out when I started out on Highway 40, it was cloudy, overcast, and snowing a little, and when I spotted a moose sleeping in the ditch in front of Boundary Ranch I stopped to shoot some photos, but between the weather and the shadow of the mountain the light was sub-par to say the least.

Shortly after I left the moose though the sun broke through the clouds and lit up the western range on the opposite side of the highway, and suddenly it was a beautiful winter morning. Stopping frequently to shoot pictures I made my way down the 40 and towards Canmore on the Spray Lakes Trail. The meadow at Mount Shark was looking particularly great with a smooth covering of drifted snow and the snaking line of the creek running through it.

By the time I hit the trailhead to Chester Lake I was feeling so inspired that I decided to throw on my snowshoes and go for a bit of an impromptu hike.

Chester Lake has been at the top of my list for a long time, yet despite trying on multiple occasions (it’s closed in the spring to stop trail erosion, and has a very healthy bear population which causes frequent closures in the summer time), I have never managed to make it there.

The hike to Chester Lake starts out climbing uphill on a wide well used trail through the forest. Though not particularly difficult the trail is steep enough to get the blood pumping, after climbing steadily for about three kilometres the trail flattens out and enters into a large open meadow. The wind was blowing hard and it was snowing and quite miserable when I got to the meadow and after a quick look I almost turned around and headed back down, mistaking the snow covered meadow for the lake. But I spotted some skiers (there was a large group of them doing avalanche safety) on the other side of the opening and realized my mistake. Eventually I did make it to the lake (it’s another kilometre or so through the open mostly level meadow to the lake), but didn’t stay long as it was getting late in the day and the weather was looked like it was getting worse.

As usually happens the sky had cleared up nicely by the time I got back to my car and I figured I might as well keep the day going and headed into Banff for a few more photos and nice long soak in the hot tub.


Sleeping Moose Winter in the mountains Winter in the mountains Winter in the mountains Winter in the mountains Winter in the mountains Winter in the mountains Winter in the mountains Winter in the mountains Winter in the mountains Winter in the mountains Winter in the mountains Winter in the mountains Winter in the mountains Winter in the mountainsWinter in the mountainsWinter in the mountainsResting ElkWinter in the mountainsWinter in the mountains

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Prairies in the Winter

Prairies in the Winter

I was feeling inspired after reading a post someone did about Snowy Owls at Boundary Bay in Vancouver. So I decided to head out east of the city and see if I could find some to photograph. I spent half the day driving around on gravel country roads, unfortunately I never did find any owls, but did spot a couple of Meadowlarks, and spent a bit of time chasing around a flock of a couple hundred Snow Bunting.

 

Snow Bunting
Flock of Snow Bunting
Winter Farmland
Winter Farmland
Winter Farmland
Winter Farmland

020313 - Prairies-84

Snow Bunting
Snow Bunting on a wire
Snow Bunting
Snow Bunting
(compare this to the previous  snow bunting picture… this is what it should look like, without colour profiles being messed up by wordpress)
Winter Farmland
Gravel road through winter Farmland

 

It was a long unproductive drive….. but still nice to spend the morning out of town.

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Kananaskis

Kananaskis

After hibernating through the first few weeks of the year cabin fever finally got the better of me, so I got up early and headed out towards Spray Lakes in Kananaskis Country to see what I could find.

All I can say is I didn’t find much at all. It was pretty much a whiteout as I headed up the hill from Canmore and along the side of the lake. As far a wildlife goes the one and only highlight was a squirrel sitting on its pile of pine cone debris. Once I hit highway 40 the snow had stopped, and the sky clearing slightly, but it was still painfully cold and windy so the few times I did stop it was short lived and not very productive.

 

Winter in the Mountains
Snow falling over Spray Lakes
Winter in the Mountains
Winter storm
Winter Squirrel
Squirrel at the dinner table
Winter in the Mountains
Mount Lorette Pond in winter
Mountain Waterfall
Waterfall on the side of Highway 40
Mountain Waterfall
Waterfall in winter
Winter in the Mountains
Mount Lorette Pond

Snowshoeing – Sawmill Trail Kananaskis Country

Snowshoeing – Sawmill Trail Kananaskis Country

  • Distance – Sawmill Snowshoe Loop – 5.07 km
  • Elevation Gain – 143 metres

On my last trip up to Bow Lake I found myself standing in the parking lot looking out across a field of snow that was at least five feet deep, and it suddenly occurred to me that I needed to buy snowshoes.

After looking around a bit I found a pair on sale for half price (thank you Black Friday) at Atmosphere, and decided to put aside my prejudiced of the Forzani Group (I don’t support them because they always mis-represent sales and all sorts of other dirty selling tricks….. and surprise they did it to me again…. but despite that it was still a great deal).

Anyway, the point is I bought a pair of snowshoes, and after starring at them on the living room floor for about a month I finally had a chance to try them out.

I wanted to try and get a picture of the Three Sisters Mountains from across Gap Lake on Highway 1A, and for what may be the first time ever I actually made it out there in the dark and was ready to go as the sun broke the horizon. Of course that never actually happened, because it was cloudy and overcast and colourless, and the mountains weren’t even visible across the lake. Not only that, but it was about fifteen below zero and the wind was so strong I only lasted about ten minutes outside (it was so windy that my tripod and camera went sliding across the ice in the middle of a shot, and I had to run out onto the lake after it, thankfully I had the tripod as low as it would go, and it never fell over).

After complete failure at Gap Lake I headed through Canmore and up the Spray Lakes Trail looking for wildlife, which I found absolutely none. It was cloudy and snowy the whole way with pretty much nothing to be seen. Eventually I made it to the Burstall Lakes parking area, where I was planning to give snowshoeing a try, but before I managed to get out of the car a half dozen SUVs pulled in behind me and what seemed like a hundred people piled out with cross-country skis.

So I left….

The next stop on the road was the Sawmill Trail, and after a quick look at the trail map I figured it was a good place for a first try.

I spent a good ten minutes in the parking lot trying to figuring out how to get the snowshoes on (apparently that wasn’t long enough, because about halfway through the hike one fell off and I realised I had it completely wrong). Eventually I made it onto the trail and headed into the forest. The trail was groomed which I thought was really silly at first, because why bother with snowshoes if the trail is groomed. But then later when it (the snowshoe) fell off in mid stride and I sunk hip deep in the middle of the trail I changed my mind about that.

When I first started out I was really surprised by how easy it was, and after a few minutes hardly even noticed I was wearing snowshoes. My favourite part was running downhill off-trail in deep powder sinking and sliding a foot or two with each step, it was a lot of fun.

The hike itself was nice, but not very exciting, although I think there may have been some nice mountain views (it was snowing the whole time, and  I only caught a glimpse or two of the surrounding mountains), the trail was forested the entire way, with no room to get a decent scenic photo. There’s a couple of different trail options, the distance posted is only one possible route.

Although conditions could have been a whole lot better, and the trail wasn’t anything special  it was a fantastic first try with the snowshoes, and I was defiantly impressed by the experience.

***Note to self…… Wear less clothes (it may have been cold in the parking lot, but five minutes up the trail I was stripping off layers and sweating like crazy)!

As far as photography goes, it was a pretty awful day, although I blame the weather for   much of it, I now know that I have a lot to learn about winter photography.

Gap Lake in winter, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Gap Lake in winter, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Gap Lake in winter, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Gap Lake in winter, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Gap Lake in winter, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Gap Lake in winter, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Sawmill snowshoe trail - Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Sawmill snowshoe trail – Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Sawmill snowshoe trail - Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Sawmill snowshoe trail – Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Sawmill snowshoe trail - Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Sawmill snowshoe trail – Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Sawmill snowshoe trail - Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Sawmill snowshoe trail – Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Sawmill snowshoe trail - Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Sawmill snowshoe trail – Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Sawmill snowshoe trail - Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada
Sawmill snowshoe trail – Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada

Created by My Tracks on Android.

Total distance: 5.07 km (3.2 mi)
Total time: 1:38:50
Moving time: 46:59
Average speed: 3.08 km/h (1.9 mi/h)
Average moving speed: 6.48 km/h (4.0 mi/h)
Max speed: 9.00 km/h (5.6 mi/h)
Average pace: 19.49 min/km (31.4 min/mi)
Average moving pace: 9.27 min/km (14.9 min/mi)
Min pace: 6.67 min/km (10.7 min/mi)
Max elevation: 1953 m (6409 ft)
Min elevation: 1810 m (5938 ft)
Elevation gain: 208 m (682 ft)
Max grade: 0 %
Min grade: 0 %
Recorded: 16-12-2012 10:17
Activity type: – Snowshoeing

saawmillsnowshoe


View Sawmill – Peter Lougheed P.P. in a larger map

Bow Valley & Icefields Parkways

Bow Valley & Icefields Parkways

I took a sunrise drive out to the mountains, heading first up the Bow Valley Parkway, and then up to the Icefields Parkway (#93) all the way to Saskatchewan River Crossing with an hour detour down the David Thompson Highway (#11).

The morning started out fantastic, if a little chilly, with great morning light on Castle Mountain, and a nice shiny layer of frost on the grass.

Unfortunately it didn’t last long and by the time I got to the Icefields Parkway it had turned cloudy and overcast and by Bow Lake the roads were shear ice, and there was a few feet of snow in the ditches. Once I headed down from the summit, the roadsides cleared up and I was able to do a bit of walking around. The mountains are not very scenic this time of year with a lot of dead grass and old dirty snow, but sometimes you just have to make due with what you’ve got (in this case it meant a lot of bracketing and HDR in post, to bring out what little colour and detail there was).

Eventually I headed east on the David Thompson Highway, with the idea of going to have a look at Abraham Lake, but I had no idea how far it was to lake and it was so windy out on the Kootenay Plains that I gave up and headed back before I made it there.

This was the first time I had ever driven east on the D.T.H. and I have to say the view of the long straight road leading directly into the distant mountain was pretty impressive.

I spent a fair bit of time wandering around in the mud by the river (below the bridge) at Saskatchewan River Crossing. There is some pretty nice scenery there, but again, everything looks pretty bleak this time of year. I will definitely have to find some time to spend there when the grass is green and the wild-flowers are blooming.

The drive back was a bit touchy with a about a foot of fresh unploughed snow (slush) that had come down at the summit since I had passed by earlier, but at least the ice that was there in the morning had melted.

As far as wildlife goes the day was a complete bust. On the way back I spotted an absolutely massive Elk on the Bow Valley Parkway, but it was gone into the trees by the time I stopped the car, that was the only living creature I saw all day. I did follow some really fresh wolf tracks for a little ways, until I broke through the ice and ended up ankle deep in mud (I think the wolf was following a weasel or something of that sort, whatever it was I didn’t recognize the tracks).

Castle Mountain, Banff National Park Alberta Canada
Castle Mountain, Banff National Park Alberta Canada
Castle Mountain, Banff National Park Alberta Canada
Castle Mountain, Banff National Park Alberta Canada
Mountain scenery along the Icefields Parkway, Banff and Jasper National Parks Alberta Canada
Mountain scenery along the Icefields Parkway, Banff and Jasper National Parks Alberta Canada
Castle Mountain, Banff National Park Alberta Canada
Castle Mountain, Banff National Park Alberta Canada
Castle Mountain, Banff National Park Alberta Canada
Castle Mountain, Banff National Park Alberta Canada
Mountain scenery along the Icefields Parkway, Banff and Jasper National Parks Alberta Canada
Mountain scenery along the Icefields Parkway, Banff and Jasper National Parks Alberta Canada
Saskatchewan River Crossing Banff National Park Alberta Canada
Saskatchewan River Crossing Banff National Park Alberta Canada
Mountain scenery along the Icefields Parkway, Banff and Jasper National Parks Alberta Canada
Mountain scenery along the Icefields Parkway, Banff and Jasper National Parks Alberta Canada
Icy winter road, Icefields Parkway, Banff and Jasper National Parks Alberta Canada
Icy winter road, Icefields Parkway, Banff and Jasper National Parks Alberta Canada – – – Click on this image to find it in my store****

 

Mountain scenery along the Icefields Parkway, Banff and Jasper National Parks Alberta Canada
Mountain scenery along the Icefields Parkway, Banff and Jasper National Parks Alberta Canada
Frozen Bow lake Icefields Parkway, Banff and Jasper National Parks Alberta Canada
Frozen Bow lake Icefields Parkway, Banff and Jasper National Parks Alberta Canada
Waterfowl lake, Icefields Parkway, Banff National Park Alberta Canada
Waterfowl lake, Icefields Parkway, Banff National Park Alberta Canada
Waterfowl lake, Icefields Parkway, Banff National Park Alberta Canada
Waterfowl lake, Icefields Parkway, Banff National Park Alberta Canada
Mountain scenery along the Icefields Parkway, Banff and Jasper National Parks Alberta Canada
Mountain scenery along the Icefields Parkway, Banff and Jasper National Parks Alberta Canada
Mountain scenery along the Icefields Parkway, Banff and Jasper National Parks Alberta Canada
Mountain scenery along the Icefields Parkway, Banff and Jasper National Parks Alberta Canada
 David Thompson Highway, Alberta Canada
David Thompson Highway, Alberta Canada
Saskatchewan River Crossing Banff National Park Alberta Canada
Saskatchewan River Crossing Banff National Park Alberta Canada
Saskatchewan River Crossing Banff National Park Alberta Canada
Saskatchewan River Crossing Banff National Park Alberta Canada
Mountain scenery along the Icefields Parkway, Banff and Jasper National Parks Alberta Canada
Mountain scenery along the Icefields Parkway, Banff and Jasper National Parks Alberta Canada
Kananaskis Drive – Barrier & Spillway Lakes

Kananaskis Drive – Barrier & Spillway Lakes

It was a warm sunny Wednesday afternoon, and I was off work early so I figured I’d head out to Kananaskis for one last chance to shoot some pictures before the snow started to pile up. Heading down Highway #40 it was all sunshine and blue skies, but the wind was so strong and cold you couldn’t stand outside for more than a minute before being blinded by watering eyes (which always makes shooting photos a bit difficult). After a short walk around Mount Lorette Ponds, and some roadside shots of Barrier Lake I made my way up Spray Lakes Trail.

A bit of a winter storm blew through and I got snowed on for a while, before it cleared up again just in time for sunset. There was a fair amount of old dirty snow in the ditches along Spray Lakes Trail, so between that, the clouds, and the falling snow I didn’t shoot a whole lot of photos. On the way back I stopped for what turned out to be some pretty decent shots of Spillway Lake, the sky had totally cleared up by now, and the sun was pretty much down, but still shining off the mountain range across the lake, which made for some nice low-key high contrast images.

Scenic mountain views, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada in Autumn
Barrier Lake, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada in Autumn
Scenic mountain views, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada in Autumn
Barrier Lake, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada in Autumn
Scenic mountain views, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada in Autumn
Barrier Lake, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada in Autumn
Scenic mountain views, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada in Autumn
Mount Lorette, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada in Autumn
Scenic mountain views, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada in Autumn
Scenic mountain views, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada in Autumn
Scenic mountain views, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada in Autumn
Scenic mountain views, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada in Autumn
Scenic mountain views, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada in Autumn
Scenic mountain views, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada in Autumn
Scenic mountain views, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada in Autumn
Scenic mountain views, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada in Autumn
Scenic mountain views, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada in Autumn
Scenic mountain views, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada in Autumn
Scenic mountain views, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada in Autumn
Scenic mountain views, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada in Autumn
Scenic mountain views, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada in Autumn
Scenic mountain views, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada in Autumn
Scenic mountain views, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada in Autumn
Scenic mountain views, Kananaskis Country Alberta Canada in Autumn
First Snows of Autumn

First Snows of Autumn

First real snowfall of the year, and I had to drive down to Millerville to do a delivery for work. Thankfully I brought my camera along, because once I got out into the country the fresh fields of snow and autumn colours were looking pretty great. Unfortunately it didn’t last long, and by the time I headed back (which is when I usually take more time to shoot pictures) the  snow had pretty much melted away. Thankfully I did stop and get a couple of pictures before it was all gone.

Snow covered farmland in Autumn, Alberta Canada
Snow covered farmland in Autumn, Alberta Canada
Snow covered farmland in Autumn, Alberta Canada
Snow covered farmland in Autumn, Alberta Canada
Snow covered farmland in Autumn, Alberta Canada
Snow covered farmland in Autumn, Alberta Canada
Snow covered farmland in Autumn, Alberta Canada
Snow covered farmland in Autumn, Alberta Canada
Horse in a snow covered pasture in autumn Alberta Canada
Horse in a snow covered pasture in autumn Alberta Canada
Horse in a snow covered pasture in autumn Alberta Canada
Horse in a snow covered pasture in autumn Alberta Canada
Snow covered farmland in Autumn, Alberta Canada
Snow covered farmland in Autumn, Alberta Canada
Cattle grazing in the field, Alberta Canada
Cattle grazing in the field, Alberta Canada
Mount Black Prince Cirque

Mount Black Prince Cirque

  • Return Distance – 4.5 km
  • Elevation Gain – 90 metres

With the weather finally starting to warm up I planned a hiking trip out to Chester Lake in Kananaskis Country with a couple of friends. But unfortunatly I found out a few days before that the trail was closed to prevent erosion and had to come up with another plan. After looking at the trail reports, it was obvious that we were going to have to stick to the lower elevations if we didn’t want to end up waist deep in snow. Most of the trails I’ve been wanting to hike were still reporting 1+ metres of snow, and high avalache risks.

After reading this I figured we should probably stick to something nice and easy. I finally settled on Mount Black Prince Cirque Trail, a nice easy 4.2 km loop (I clocked it at 4.98km) with about 90 metres of elevation gain.

The trailhead is at a parking lot marked Mount Black Prince, on Spray Lakes Trail, about 8km from Kananaskis Lakes Trail.

The trail starts out on a old abandoned logging road, heading easily uphill for about 15 minutes, before leveling out crossing over a bridge and leading into a boulder strew forested area to the shore of Warspite Lake. From what I read before the hike the lake had dried up a few years ago, so I was pleasently surprised when we got there and found a nice little lake.

After following along the side of the lake and through a open boulder covered area, the trail crosses a nice little footbridge over a small stream and enters thick forest before looping back around and reconnecting to the logging road and heading back down the hill.

There was still quite a bit of snow in patches on the trail, and the weather was pretty crappy with a sprinkling of rain. Although the tempurature was almost perfact for hiking (not cold, but cool enough to be comfortable).

The overcast sky was absolutely atrocious for taking photos, and I made the rookie mistake of not realizing I was shooting with my  ISO still set to a 1000. So the photos are heavily edited and pretty crappy, but sometimes thats just how it goes.

The trail is actually an interpritive trail with a government pamphlet that’s supposed to go with it, which we didn’t have at the time. But here it is…  http://www.albertaparks.ca/media/3291/Black_Prince_Cirque_Trail.pdf

After the hike we headed down the road to Buller pond to kick back with a campfire and some fishing (which didn’t really happen, because there was zero fish activity in the water).

While we were feasting on hot-dogs a beautiful cinnamon coloured black bear crossed into view through the opening on the other side of the pond, which is always great to see.

Although the weather and the light was terrible, it was a great day out in the mountains with friends, and a nice easy start to the hiking season.

 

Hiking Mount Black Prince Cirque Trail to Warspite Lake
Chris at Warspite Lake
Chris at Warspite Lake
Hiking Mount Black Prince Cirque Trail to Warspite Lake
Hiking Mount Black Prince Cirque Trail to Warspite Lake
Hiking Mount Black Prince Cirque Trail to Warspite Lake
Hiking Mount Black Prince Cirque Trail to Warspite Lake (serious HDR)
Hiking Mount Black Prince Cirque Trail to Warspite Lake
Hiking Mount Black Prince Cirque Trail to Warspite Lake (HDR)
Hiking Mount Black Prince Cirque Trail to Warspite Lake
Hiking Mount Black Prince Cirque Trail to Warspite Lake
Hiking Mount Black Prince Cirque Trail to Warspite Lake (HDR)
Buller Pond
Cinnamon Black Bear at Buller pond, Kananaskis Country Alberta

Mount Black Prince

Created by My Tracks on Android.

Total distance: 4.98 km (3.1 mi)
Total time: 1:56:09
Moving time: 1:03:06
Average speed: 2.57 km/h (1.6 mi/h)
Average moving speed: 4.73 km/h (2.9 mi/h)
Max speed: 10.50 km/h (6.5 mi/h)
Average pace: 23.33 min/km (37.5 min/mi)
Average moving pace: 12.67 min/km (20.4 min/mi)
Min pace: 5.72 min/km (9.2 min/mi)
Max elevation: 1826 m (5992 ft)
Min elevation: 1714 m (5622 ft)
Elevation gain: 303 m (993 ft)
Max grade: 0 %
Min grade: 0 %
Recorded: 16-06-2012 14:05
Activity type: –


View Hiking Mount Black Prince in a larger map

Kananaskis In Winter

Kananaskis In Winter

Photos from an afternoon drive up to Kananaskis Lakes.

 

 

 

 

 

The amount of snow at the Upper Lake was astonishing, I had to stand on the trunk of my car and hold the camera over my head to get this shot, It was about 10 feet deep.

 

 

 

Big Hill Springs Provincial Park

Big Hill Springs Provincial Park

Loop Trail

  • Distance – 2.5 km
  • Elevation – 88 metres

I don’t think I had ever been to Big Hill Springs before, so when one of my photo groups planned an outing there I though it was a great idea. But when It came time to go I had a couple of friends wanting to come and we were running late. So we just went and did our own thing (I said hello to the group in passing, but that was about it).

The springs make up a nice little set of waterfalls, so we spent some time playing with long exposures. Other than the water there wasn’t really much to photograph, and the light was pretty flat and gloomy, so we ended up doing a bit of a hike (more like a walk) through the park.

There is a nice little trail that passes by all of the falls, and then continues on up through the forest in a big loop that ends up back at the parking lot. It was solid ice in a few spots, which got somewhat tricky on the steep sections, but other than that was a nice walk walk through the forest.

Flowing water at Big Hill Springs Provincial Park

 

Flowing water at Big Hill Springs Provincial Park

 

Flowing water at Big Hill Springs Provincial Park

 

Flowing water at Big Hill Springs Provincial Park

 Big Hill Springs Loop

Created by My Tracks on Android.

Total Distance: 2.59 km (1.6 mi)
Total Time: 1:03:30
Moving Time: 31:48
Average Speed: 2.45 km/h (1.5 mi/h)
Average Moving Speed: 4.89 km/h (3.0 mi/h)
Max Speed: 11.13 km/h (6.9 mi/h)
Min Elevation: 1178 m (3865 ft)
Max Elevation: 1266 m (4153 ft)
Elevation Gain: 215 m (705 ft)
Max Grade: 0 %
Min Grade: 0 %
Recorded: Sun Feb 05 14:54:56 MST 2012
Activity type: trail hiking

 


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Winter in Kananaskis Country

Winter in Kananaskis Country

I went out early one morning for a drive up to Spray Lakes in Kananaskis Country with the intetion of getting some winter mountain pictures. It was a really cold morning, but thankfully by the time sun came up the sky was perfectly clear and it turned out to be a really nice day, (or as nice as a day can be in February). As much as I don’t like the snow it can make for some really good photography, especially when it’s still fresh and clean looking.

I was barely up the hill from Canmore when I spotted a couple Spruce Grouse, and stopped to chase them around for a few minutes until my fingers got too cold.

Later on I did a bit of a hike on the snowshoe trails around Mud Lake, and walked halfway across the ice of Spray Lakes, following on the path of a group of dog-sledders.

It was as good a morning as I could have hoped for to be out in the mountains at that time of year.

Wild Spruce Grouse in winter, Kananaskis Country, Alberta Canada
Wild Spruce Grouse in winter, Kananaskis Country, Alberta Canada
Wild Spruce grouse in winter, Alberta Canada
Snowshoe Hare tracks through fresh snow in the mountains, Alberta Canada
Upper Kananaskis Lake in winter, Alberta Canada
Buller Pond, Peter Lougheed Provincial Park, in winter, Alberta Canada
Snowshoe Trails through the mountains, Mud Lake Peter Lougheed Provincial Park Alberta Canada
Spray Lakes in winter, Alberta Canada

 

Carburn Park

Carburn Park

It was a particularly warm January afternoon, so I thought I’d take a walk and maybe do some fishing at Carburn Park. The fishing wasn’t really happening, but I did get up close with some of the resident White-tailed Deer, and of course the ducks!

Ducks and Deer at Carburn Park, Calgary

 

Young White-tailed Buck, Carburn Park, Calgary

 

Sunset over the Bow River, and the Southland Park pedestrian bridge, Calgary, Alberta

 

Dinosaur Provincial Park, Alberta

Dinosaur Provincial Park, Alberta

It occured to me one morning that I had never been to Dinosaur Provincial Park, so on a whim we jumped in the car and headed out to have a look. It wasn’t very exciting this time of year, with everything dead and dry. As nice as the view was from the top it was hard to enjoy with the icy winter winds blowing around us at 80 kilometres per hour, but at least the sun was out. It was still good to have a look around, do a bit of a hike and just get out of town for the afternoon.

Deer in the Park

 

Dinosaur Provincial Park Alberta

 

Dinosaur Provincial Park Alberta

 

 

Jasper – Day 3.

Jasper – Day 3.

On the third day we headed out early for another drive down Maligne Lake Road and again encountered nothing. So after a bit of breakfast in town we hit the highway and made the long slow journey home. This time taking the Icefields Parkway (Hwy. #93), making all the usual stops along the way. Climbing around the ice at Tangle Falls, taking the short hike down to Mistaya Canyon, chasing (not very) wild Ravens around a parking lot, and wandering the shores of Bow and Waterfowl Lakes. Though there wasn’t any wildlife to be seen, it was a good drive home and a nice autumn day to be out in the mountains.

Tangle Creek Falls, Jasper National Park, Alberta
Tangle Creek Falls, Jasper National Park, Alberta
Tangle Creek Falls, Jasper National Park, Alberta
Wild Raven
Wild Raven
Waterfowl Lake, Banff Alberta
Waterfowl Lake, Banff Alberta
Bow Lake, Banff Alberta
Bow Lake, Banff Alberta
Lodge at Bow Lake, Banff National Park Alberta.
Jasper – Day 2.

Jasper – Day 2.

On our second day in Jasper we got up for sunrise and headed down to Maligne Lake, (on our last trip most of the wildlife we saw was on the long stretch of road between the town and the lake). We didn’t see much on the drive down, but when we got to the parking lot at the lake there was a couple deer that we had fun chasing around for a few minutes (it was still a bit to dark to get any really good shots though).  After some sunrise photos around the lake shore and on the docks, we spotted what looked like a couple of Moose on the far side of the lake and headed over in the car to investigate. Driving down the boat ramp we were able to confirm that it was in fact a Moose and her young Calf bathing and feeding just off shore. We couldn’t get into a good position in the car and ended up parking and trail-blazing down to the shore (the moose were far to close to the ramp to follow it down). Taking cover behind some garbage bins on the dock we got to spend a few minutes watching while they fed from the lake bottom.

The rest of the day was not very productive at all. I think we literally drove down every single stretch of road in the park, Including one that turned out to be a hiking trail, (but that’s a whole other story). Unfortunately we didn’t see anything, the light wasn’t great, and to be honest we were both pretty exhausted, so we turned in early and spent the afternoon relaxing in the hot tub.

Mule Deer hiding in the tall grass.

 

Maligne Lake, Jasper Alberta at Sunrise

 

Maligne Lake, Jasper Alberta at Sunrise

 

Maligne Lake, Jasper Alberta at Sunrise

 

Maligne Lake, Jasper Alberta at Sunrise
Wild Moose feeding in Maligne Lake, Jasper Alberta

 

Wild Moose feeding in Maligne Lake, Jasper Alberta

 

Wild Moose and Calg feeding in Maligne Lake, Jasper Alberta
Athabasca River, Jasper Alberta

 

Athabasca River, Jasper Alberta

 

Sign on the Dock at Maligne Lake.
One of my favourite shots of the trip it pretty much summed things up… We were a couple weeks too late, and winter was coming!